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Drugs

, Volume 76, Issue 14, pp 1381–1391 | Cite as

Daclatasvir: A Review in Chronic Hepatitis C

  • Gillian M. Keating
Adis Drug Evaluation

Abstract

The hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5A replication complex inhibitor daclatasvir (Daklinza®) is indicated for use in combination with sofosbuvir, with or without ribavirin, in a pangenotypic all-oral regimen. In patients with chronic HCV genotype 1 or 3 infection without cirrhosis, a 12-week regimen of daclatasvir plus sofosbuvir achieved high sustained virological response rates 12 weeks’ post-treatment (SVR12), regardless of prior treatment experience, according to the results of the AI444040 and ALLY-3 trials. In the ALLY-3+ trial, high SVR12 rates were achieved with a 12- or 16-week regimen of daclatasvir plus sofosbuvir and ribavirin in patients with chronic HCV genotype 3 infection and advanced fibrosis or compensated cirrhosis. A daclatasvir plus sofosbuvir-based regimen demonstrated efficacy in patients with chronic HCV genotype 1, 3 or 4 infection and advanced cirrhosis or post-transplant recurrence in the ALLY-1 trial, and in patients co-infected with HCV genotype 1, 3 or 4 and HIV-1 in the ALLY-2 trial. Results of clinical trials were supported by real-world data from early-access programmes that included high numbers of patients who would have been excluded from phase 3 trials because of advanced disease and/or concomitant medical conditions. Daclatasvir plus sofosbuvir with or without ribavirin was generally well tolerated. In conclusion, an all-oral regimen comprising daclatasvir plus sofosbuvir with or without ribavirin is an important option for use in treatment-naive or treatment-experienced patients with chronic HCV genotype 1, 3 or 4 infection, including in patients with advanced liver disease, post-transplant recurrence and HIV-1 co-infection.

Keywords

Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate Sofosbuvir Etravirine IL28B Genotype SVR12 Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

During the peer review process, the manufacturer of daclatasvir was also offered an opportunity to review this article. Changes resulting from comments received were made on the basis of scientific and editorial merit.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Funding

The preparation of this review was not supported by any external funding.

Conflicts of interest

Gillian Keating is a salaried employee of Adis/Springer, is responsible for the article content and declares no relevant conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.SpringerMairangi BayNew Zealand

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