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Drugs

, Volume 75, Issue 2, pp 207–217 | Cite as

Silodosin: A Review of Its Use in the Treatment of the Signs and Symptoms of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

  • Gillian M. Keating
Adis Drug Evaluation

Abstract

Silodosin is a highly selective α1A-adrenoceptor antagonist indicated for the treatment of the signs and symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Oral silodosin had a rapid onset of effect in men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) associated with BPH, with improvements seen in voiding and storage symptoms, maximum urinary flow rate and health-related quality of life in well-designed, 12-week trials. Silodosin was noninferior to tamsulosin in terms of improving LUTS associated with BPH. The efficacy of silodosin was maintained in 9-month extension studies and was also seen in a phase IV study conducted in a real-world setting. Silodosin was generally well tolerated and was associated with a low risk of orthostatic hypotension. Abnormal ejaculation was the most commonly reported adverse event, although few patients discontinued treatment with silodosin because of this adverse event. In conclusion, silodosin is a useful option for the treatment of LUTS associated with BPH.

Keywords

Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Lower Urinary Tract Symptom Orthostatic Hypotension International Prostate Symptom Score Tamsulosin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Disclosure

The preparation of this review was not supported by any external funding. Gillian Keating is a salaried employee of Adis/Springer. During the peer review process, the manufacturer of the agent under review was offered an opportunity to comment on this article. Changes resulting from comments received were made by the author on the basis of scientific and editorial merit.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.SpringerAucklandNew Zealand

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