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Drugs

, Volume 74, Issue 1, pp 75–97 | Cite as

Elvitegravir/Cobicistat/Emtricitabine/Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate Single-Tablet Regimen (Stribild®): A Review of Its Use in the Management of HIV-1 Infection in Adults

  • Caroline M. PerryEmail author
Adis Drug Evaluation

Abstract

A new single-tablet, fixed-dose formulation consisting of elvitegravir, an HIV-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI); cobicistat, a pharmacokinetic enhancer; emtricitabine, a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor; and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (tenofovir DF), a nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF 150 mg/150 mg/200 mg/300 mg; Stribild®) is available in some countries for the once-daily treatment of HIV-1 infection in antiretroviral therapy-naïve adults. Elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF is the first INSTI-based single-tablet regimen available for the complete initial treatment of adults with HIV-1 infection. In two large, randomized, double-blind, phase III trials, once-daily treatment with elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF was effective in reducing plasma HIV-1 RNA levels to <50 copies/mL at the week 48 assessment and showed virological efficacy noninferior to that of the efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF single-tablet regimen or a once-daily regimen of atazanavir plus ritonavir (ritonavir-boosted atazanavir) plus the fixed-dose combination of emtricitabine/tenofovir DF. Elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF also showed durable efficacy in terms of achieving sustained suppression of HIV-1 RNA levels to <50 copies/mL for up to 144 weeks in both of the phase III trials. Elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF is an important addition to the group of simplified once-daily single-tablet regimens currently available for the effective treatment of HIV-1 infection in antiretroviral therapy-naïve patients and is among the preferred regimens recommended for use as initial treatment. It offers advantages over more complex multiple-tablet regimens that may impair treatment adherence, which is fundamental to the successful management of HIV-1 infection.

Keywords

Tenofovir Atazanavir Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate Emtricitabine Raltegravir 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Disclosure

The preparation of this review was not supported by any external funding. During the peer review process, the manufacturer of the agent under review was offered an opportunity to comment on this article. Changes resulting from comments received were made by the authors on the basis of scientific and editorial merit.

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© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.AdisNorth ShoreNew Zealand

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