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Drugs

, Volume 73, Issue 8, pp 857–874 | Cite as

Tofacitinib: A Review of its Use in Adult Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

  • Lesley J. Scott
Adis Drug Evaluation

Abstract

Tofacitinib (Xeljanz®) is the first approved drug in a new class of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), the Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors. JAKs have a pivotal role in triggering cytokine-induced signal transduction pathways that influence normal and pathological cellular processes of haematopoiesis and immune cell function, including pathogenic mechanisms involved in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Selective inhibition of JAKs by tofacitinib potentially modulates inflammatory processes and provides a novel approach for the treatment of RA. Oral tofacitinib is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with active RA who have had an inadequate response to methotrexate and/or other DMARDs. In several large well designed trials, tofacitinib, in combination with methotrexate or other nonbiological DMARDs or as monotherapy, was an effective and generally well tolerated DMARD for the treatment of adult patients with moderately to severely active RA who had had an inadequate response to previous DMARDs, including tumour necrosis factor-α inhibitors. Direct head-to-head trials and/or further clinical experience (including long-term safety data), along with robust pharmacoeconomic studies, are required to more definitively position tofacitinib relative to other currently available DMARDs. In the meantime, tofacitinib (alone or in combination with nonbiological DMARDs) is an emerging option for the treatment of DMARD-experienced adult patients with moderately to severely active RA who have had an inadequate response to or are intolerant of methotrexate or other DMARDs.

Keywords

Active Rheumatoid Arthritis Tofacitinib Biological DMARDs Abstract Presentation ACR20 Response Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Disclosure

The preparation of this review was not supported by any external funding. During the peer review process, the manufacturer of the agent under review was offered an opportunity to comment on the article. Changes resulting from comments received were made by the author based on their scientific and editorial merit.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.AdisAucklandNew Zealand

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