A Review of Treatment Options for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

Abstract

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is an atypical parkinsonian condition characterized by a symmetric akinetic–rigid syndrome, early falls, supranuclear gaze palsy, and a frontotemporal behavioral syndrome. The typical phenotype is termed Richardson’s syndrome, but numerous other phenotypes have been described. The pathophysiology of PSP is not fully understood, but dysfunction of the tau protein seems to play a central role. Despite exciting new knowledge on the pathophysiology of PSP, there is still no highly effective symptomatic or disease-modifying treatment. We review the evidence on pharmacotherapy and experimental therapies in PSP and provide levels of recommendation for the off-label use of commonly used drugs in this disorder.

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Correspondence to Maria Stamelou.

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No funding was received for the publication of this review.

Conflict of interest

Dr. Maria Stamelou and Professor Günter Höglinger have participated in clinical trials evaluating davunetide (Allon Therapeutics Inc.), tideglusib (Noscira Inc.), and co-enzyme Q10 (MSE Pharmazeutika) in PSP.

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Stamelou, M., Höglinger, G. A Review of Treatment Options for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy. CNS Drugs 30, 629–636 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40263-016-0347-2

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Keywords

  • Levodopa
  • CoQ10
  • Progressive Supranuclear Palsy
  • Rasagiline
  • Progressive Supranuclear Palsy