Tralokinumab for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

Abstract

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a relapsing or chronic heterogeneous inflammatory skin disorder with a substantial economic and social impact. AD is a multifactorial disease regulated by a diverse set of environmental and genetic determinants. The main factors involved in the pathogenesis of AD are epidermal barrier dysfunction, immune dysregulation, and dysbiosis. Current data have valued interleukin (IL)-13 as conceivably the crucial cytokine in the underlying inflammation of AD. Advances in understanding AD pathophysiology have driven the progress of targeted immunomodulatory treatments for the treatment of AD, including tralokinumab, a selective IL-13 inhibitor. A phase IIb clinical trial showed that a dosing regimen of 150 or 300 mg every 2 weeks effectively treated moderate-to-severe AD in adults with an acceptable tolerability profile. Phase III clinical trials demonstrated that results with tralokinumab in monotherapy were superior to those with placebo at 16 weeks of treatment. It was also well tolerated up to 52 weeks in the vast majority of patients. In addition, in association with topical corticosteroids, tralokinumab was well tolerated and effective and had a favorable risk–benefit profile. These data provide additional evidence that IL-13 is central to AD pathogenesis, suggesting that tralokinumab may be seen as an innovative option for the treatment of moderate-to-severe AD.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Fig. 1

References

  1. 1.

    Deleanu D, Nedelea I. Biological therapies for atopic dermatitis: an update (Review). Exp Ther Med. 2018. https://doi.org/10.3892/etm.2018.6989.

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  2. 2.

    Asher MI, Montefort S, Björkstén B, et al. Worldwide time trends in the prevalence of symptoms of asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema in childhood: ISAAC phases one and three repeat multicountry cross-sectional surveys. Lancet. 2006;368(9537):733–43. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(06)69283-0.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  3. 3.

    Boguniewicz M, Leung DYM. Recent insights into atopic dermatitis and implications for management of infectious complications. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010;125(1):4–13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2009.11.027.

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  4. 4.

    Kim BE, Leung DYM. Significance of skin barrier dysfunction in atopic dermatitis. Allergy Asthma Immunol Res. 2018;10(3):207. https://doi.org/10.4168/aair.2018.10.3.207.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  5. 5.

    Leung DYM, Boguniewicz M, Howell MD, Nomura I, Hamid QA. New insights into atopic dermatitis. J Clin Invest. 2004;113(5):651–7. https://doi.org/10.1172/JCI21060.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  6. 6.

    Siegfried EC, Jaworski JC, Eichenfield LF, et al. Developing drugs for treatment of atopic dermatitis in children (≥3 months to <18 years of age): draft guidance for industry. Pediatr Dermatol. 2018;35(3):303–22. https://doi.org/10.1111/pde.13452.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  7. 7.

    Renert-Yuval Y, Thyssen JP, Bissonnette R, et al. Biomarkers in atopic dermatitis—a review on behalf of the International Eczema Council. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2021. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2021.01.013.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  8. 8.

    Esaki H, Brunner PM, Renert-Yuval Y, et al. Early-onset pediatric atopic dermatitis is T H 2 but also T H 17 polarized in skin. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2016;138(6):1639–51. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2016.07.013.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  9. 9.

    Czarnowicki T, Esaki H, Gonzalez J, et al. Alterations in B-cell subsets in pediatric patients with early atopic dermatitis. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2017;140(1):134-144.e9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2016.09.060.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  10. 10.

    Czarnowicki T, He H, Krueger JG, Guttman-Yassky E. Atopic dermatitis endotypes and implications for targeted therapeutics. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2019;143(1):1–11. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2018.10.032.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  11. 11.

    Moyle M, Cevikbas F, Harden JL, Guttman-Yassky E. Understanding the immune landscape in atopic dermatitis: the era of biologics and emerging therapeutic approaches. Exp Dermatol. 2019;28(7):756–68. https://doi.org/10.1111/exd.13911.

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  12. 12.

    Fujii M. Current understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms of atopic dermatitis: interactions among skin barrier dysfunction, immune abnormalities and pruritus. Biol Pharm Bull. 2020;43(1):12–9. https://doi.org/10.1248/bpb.b19-00088.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  13. 13.

    Furue M, Ulzii D, Vu YH, Tsuji G, Kido-Nakahara M, Nakahara T. Pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis: current paradigm. Iran J Immunol. 2019;16(2):97–107. https://doi.org/10.22034/IJI.2019.80253.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  14. 14.

    Silverberg JI, Kantor R. The role of interleukins 4 and/or 13 in the pathophysiology and treatment of atopic dermatitis. Dermatol Clin. 2017;35(3):327–34. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.det.2017.02.005.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  15. 15.

    Guttman-Yassky E, Nograles KE, Krueger JG. Contrasting pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis—Part II: immune cell subsets and therapeutic concepts. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2011;127(6):1420–32. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2011.01.054.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  16. 16.

    Napolitano M, Marasca C, Fabbrocini G, Patruno C. Adult atopic dermatitis: new and emerging therapies. Expert Rev Clin Pharmacol. 2018;11(9):867–78. https://doi.org/10.1080/17512433.2018.1507734.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  17. 17.

    Boguniewicz M, Alexis AF, Beck LA, et al. Expert perspectives on management of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis: a multidisciplinary consensus addressing current and emerging therapies. J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2017;5(6):1519–31. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2017.08.005.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  18. 18.

    Guttman-Yassky E, Bissonnette R, Ungar B, et al. Dupilumab progressively improves systemic and cutaneous abnormalities in patients with atopic dermatitis. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2019;143(1):155–72. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2018.08.022.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  19. 19.

    Hamilton JD, Suárez-Fariñas M, Dhingra N, et al. Dupilumab improves the molecular signature in skin of patients with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2014;134(6):1293–300. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2014.10.013.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  20. 20.

    Simpson EL, Bieber T, Guttman-Yassky E, et al. Two phase 3 trials of dupilumab versus placebo in atopic dermatitis. N Engl J Med. 2016;375(24):2335–48. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1610020.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  21. 21.

    Beck LA, Thaçi D, Hamilton JD, et al. Dupilumab treatment in adults with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis. N Engl J Med. 2014;371(2):130–9. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1314768.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  22. 22.

    Loh TY, Hsiao JL, Shi VY. Therapeutic potential of lebrikizumab in the treatment of atopic dermatitis. J Asthma Allergy. 2020;13:109–14. https://doi.org/10.2147/JAA.S211032.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  23. 23.

    Bieber T. Interleukin-13: targeting an underestimated cytokine in atopic dermatitis. Allergy. 2020;75(1):54–62. https://doi.org/10.1111/all.13954.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  24. 24.

    Furue K, Ito T, Tsuji G, et al. The <scp>IL</scp> -13– <scp>OVOL</scp> 1– <scp>FLG</scp> axis in atopic dermatitis. Immunology. 2019;158(4):281–6. https://doi.org/10.1111/imm.13120.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  25. 25.

    Tsoi LC, Rodriguez E, Degenhardt F, et al. Atopic dermatitis is an IL-13–dominant disease with greater molecular heterogeneity compared to psoriasis. J Invest Dermatol. 2019;139(7):1480–9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jid.2018.12.018.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  26. 26.

    Weidinger S, Beck LA, Bieber T, Kabashima K, Irvine AD. Atopic dermatitis. Nat Rev Dis Prim. 2018;4(1):1. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41572-018-0001-z.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  27. 27.

    Tsoi LC, Rodriguez E, Stölzl D, et al. Progression of acute-to-chronic atopic dermatitis is associated with quantitative rather than qualitative changes in cytokine responses. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2020;145(5):1406–15. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2019.11.047.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  28. 28.

    Szegedi K, Lutter R, Res PC, et al. Cytokine profiles in interstitial fluid from chronic atopic dermatitis skin. J Eur Acad Dermatology Venereol. 2015;29(11):2136–44. https://doi.org/10.1111/jdv.13160.

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  29. 29.

    He H, Bissonnette R, Wu J, et al. Tape strips detect distinct immune and barrier profiles in atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2021;147(1):199–212. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2020.05.048.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  30. 30.

    Guttman-Yassky E, Diaz A, Pavel AB, et al. Use of tape strips to detect immune and barrier abnormalities in the skin of children with early-onset atopic dermatitis. JAMA Dermatol. 2019;155(12):1358. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamadermatol.2019.2983.

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  31. 31.

    Suárez-Fariñas M, Tintle SJ, Shemer A, et al. Nonlesional atopic dermatitis skin is characterized by broad terminal differentiation defects and variable immune abnormalities. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2011;127(4):954-964.e4. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2010.12.1124.

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  32. 32.

    Gittler JK, Shemer A, Suárez-Fariñas M, et al. Progressive activation of TH2/TH22 cytokines and selective epidermal proteins characterizes acute and chronic atopic dermatitis. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2012;130(6):1344–54. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2012.07.012.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  33. 33.

    Gooderham MJ, Hong HC, Eshtiaghi P, Papp KA. Dupilumab: a review of its use in the treatment of atopic dermatitis. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018;78(3):S28–36. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2017.12.022.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  34. 34.

    Oh M-H, Oh SY, Lu J, et al. TRPA1-dependent pruritus in IL-13–induced chronic atopic dermatitis. J Immunol. 2013;191(11):5371–82. https://doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.1300300.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  35. 35.

    Ungar B, Garcet S, Gonzalez J, et al. An integrated model of atopic dermatitis biomarkers highlights the systemic nature of the disease. J Invest Dermatol. 2017;137(3):603–13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jid.2016.09.037.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  36. 36.

    Czarnowicki T, Esaki H, Gonzalez J, et al. Early pediatric atopic dermatitis shows only a cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA)+ TH2/TH1 cell imbalance, whereas adults acquire CLA+ TH22/TC22 cell subsets. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2015;136(4):941-951.e3. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2015.05.049.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  37. 37.

    Czarnowicki T, He H, Canter T, et al. Evolution of pathologic T-cell subsets in patients with atopic dermatitis from infancy to adulthood. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2020;145(1):215–28. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2019.09.031.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  38. 38.

    Hamann CR, Thyssen JP. Monoclonal antibodies against interleukin 13 and interleukin 31RA in development for atopic dermatitis. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018;78(3):S37–42. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2017.12.018.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  39. 39.

    Furue M, Ulzii D, Nakahara T, et al. Implications of IL-13Rα2 in atopic skin inflammation. Allergol Int. 2020;69(3):412–6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.alit.2020.01.005.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  40. 40.

    Brunner PM, Guttman-Yassky E, Leung DYM. The immunology of atopic dermatitis and its reversibility with broad-spectrum and targeted therapies. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2017;139(4):S65–76. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2017.01.011.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  41. 41.

    Hussein YM, Ahmad AS, Ibrahem MM, et al. Interleukin 13 receptors as biochemical markers in atopic patients. J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol. 2011;21(2):101–7.

    CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  42. 42.

    Popovic B, Breed J, Rees DG, et al. Structural characterisation reveals mechanism of IL-13-neutralising monoclonal antibody tralokinumab as inhibition of binding to IL-13Rα1 and IL-13Rα2. J Mol Biol. 2017;429(2):208–19. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmb.2016.12.005.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  43. 43.

    Gonçalves F, Freitas E, Torres T. Selective IL-13 inhibitors for the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Drugs Context. 2021;10:1–17. https://doi.org/10.7573/dic.2021-1-7.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  44. 44.

    Wollenberg A, Howell MD, Guttman-Yassky E, et al. Treatment of atopic dermatitis with tralokinumab, an anti–IL-13 mAb. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2019;143(1):135–41. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2018.05.029.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  45. 45.

    Munera-Campos M, Carrascosa JM. Innovación en dermatitis atópica: de la patogenia a la terapéutica. Actas Dermosifiliogr. 2020;111(3):205–21. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ad.2019.11.002.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  46. 46.

    Wollenberg A, Howell MD, Guttman-Yassky E, et al. A phase 2b dose-ranging efficacy and safety study of tralokinumab in adult patients with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis. Ski J Cutan Med. 2018;2:S29. https://doi.org/10.25251/skin.2.supp.28.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  47. 47.

    Silverberg JI, Guttman-Yassky E, Gooderham M, et al. Health-related quality of life with tralokinumab in moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2020. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anai.2020.12.004.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  48. 48.

    Merola JF, Bagel J, Almgren P, Røpke MA, Lophaven KW, Vest NS, Grewal P. Tralokinumab does not impact vaccine-induced immune responses: Results from a 30-week, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in adults with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2021 Mar 17:S0190-9622(21)00577-6. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2021.03.032. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 33744356.

  49. 49.

    Bieber, T.,Beck, L., Pink, A., Saeki, H., Eichenfield, L., Werfel, T., Rosholm, A., Røpke, M., Paller A. Impact of targeting interleukin-13 on Staphylococcus aureus colonisation: results from a Phase 3, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with tralokinumab in adult patients with atopic dermatitis. Oct 2020, 20th EADV Congr.

  50. 50.

    Wollenberg A, Blauvelt A, Guttman‐Yassky E, et al. Tralokinumab for moderate‐to‐severe atopic dermatitis: results from two 52‐week, randomized, double‐blind, multicentre, placebo‐controlled phase III trials (ECZTRA 1 and ECZTRA 2). Br J Dermatol. 2020. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjd.19574

  51. 51.

    Silverberg, J., Barbarot, S., Gooderham, M., Simon, J., Simpson E. Specifically targeting interleukin-13 with tralokinumab improved sleep in two Phase 3, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in patients with atopic dermatitis. 20th EADV Congr Washington, DC, USA s.n, Oct 2020.

  52. 52.

    Silverberg JI, Toth D, Bieber T, et al. Tralokinumab plus topical corticosteroids for the treatment of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis: results from the double-blind, randomized, multicentre, placebo-controlled phase III ECZTRA 3 trial. Br J Dermatol. 2020. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjd.19573.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  53. 53.

    ClinicalTrials. gov. Long-term Extension Trial in Subjects With Atopic Dermatitis Who Participated in Previous Tralokinumab Trials (ECZTEND). Accessed May 08, 2021. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03587805

  54. 54.

    Blauvelt A, et al. Long-term Improvements Observed in Tralokinumab-treated Patients With Moderate-to-severe Atopic Dermatitis: An ECZTEND Interim Analysis. American Academy of Dermatology Association Virtual Meeting Experience (AAD VMX); April 23-25, 2021. On-demand video oral presentation 29393.

  55. 55.

    Blauvelt A, et al. Long-term Safety, Efficacy, and Adherence to Tralokinumab Treatment in Moderate-to-severe Atopic Dermatitis for up to 3 Years: Interim Readout of ECZTEND, a Phase 3, Long-term Extension Trial. American Academy of Dermatology Association Virtual Meeting Experience (AAD VMX); April 23-25, 2021. E-poster 27697.

  56. 56.

    Wollenberg A, Barbarot S, Bieber T, et al. Consensus-based European guidelines for treatment of atopic eczema (atopic dermatitis) in adults and children: part II. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2018;32(6):850–78. https://doi.org/10.1111/jdv.14888.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  57. 57.

    Paller AS, Kabashima K, Bieber T. Therapeutic pipeline for atopic dermatitis: end of the drought? J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2017;140(3):633–43. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2017.07.006.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  58. 58.

    Abraham S, Haufe E, Harder I, et al. Implementation of dupilumab in routine care of atopic eczema: results from the German national registry <scp>TREAT</scp> germany. Br J Dermatol. 2020;183(2):382–4. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjd.18958.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  59. 59.

    Wang C, Kraus CN, Patel KG, Ganesan AK, Grando SA. Real-world experience of dupilumab treatment for atopic dermatitis in adults: a retrospective analysis of patients’ records. Int J Dermatol. 2020;59(2):253–6. https://doi.org/10.1111/ijd.14573.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  60. 60.

    Akinlade B, Guttman-Yassky E, Bruin-Weller M, et al. Conjunctivitis in dupilumab clinical trials. Br J Dermatol. 2019;181(3):459–73. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjd.17869.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  61. 61.

    Guttman-Yassky E, Blauvelt A, Eichenfield LF, et al. Efficacy and safety of lebrikizumab, a high-affinity interleukin 13 inhibitor, in adults with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis. JAMA Dermatol. 2020;156(4):411. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamadermatol.2020.0079.

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  62. 62.

    Thyssen JP, Bruin-Weller MS, Paller AS, et al. Conjunctivitis in atopic dermatitis patients with and without dupilumab therapy—international eczema council survey and opinion. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2019;33(7):1224–31. https://doi.org/10.1111/jdv.15608.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  63. 63.

    Kotenko SV, Izotova LS, Mirochnitchenko OV, et al. Identification, cloning, and characterization of a novel soluble receptor that binds IL-22 and neutralizes its activity. J Immunol. 2001;166(12):7096–103. https://doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.166.12.7096.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  64. 64.

    Guttman-Yassky E, Brunner PM, Neumann AU, et al. Efficacy and safety of fezakinumab (an IL-22 monoclonal antibody) in adults with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis inadequately controlled by conventional treatments: a randomized, double-blind, phase 2a trial. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018;78(5):872-881.e6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2018.01.016.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  65. 65.

    Oluwa, F., Vilsbøll, A.W., Kragh N. Real World Evidence of Ophthalmology Health Care Resource Use in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis In England. 2020 EADV Virtual Congr Denmark s.n P0272.

  66. 66.

    ClinicalTrials. gov. Drug-drug Interaction Trial With Tralokinumab in Moderate to Severe Atopic Dermatitis – ECZTRA 4. Accessed June 27, 2020. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03556592?term=tralokinumab&cond=atopic+dermatitis& draw=1& ran.

  67. 67.

    ClinicalTrials. gov. Tralokinumab Monotherapy for Adolescent Subjects With Moderate to Severe Atopic Dermatitis - ECZTRA 6 (ECZema TRAlokinumab Trial no. 6). Accessed June 27, 2020. https://clinicaltrialsgov/ct2/show/NCT03526861?term=tralokinumab&.

  68. 68.

    ClinicalTrials. gov. Tralokinumab in Combination With Topical Corticosteroids in Subjects With Severe Atopic Dermatitis Who Are Not Adequately Controlled With or Have Contraindications to Oral Cyclosporine A (ECZTRA 7). Accessed June 27, 2020. https:// cl.

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Tiago Torres.

Ethics declarations

Funding

No funding was received for the preparation of this manuscript.

Conflict of interest

Egídio Freitas has no conflicts of interest to declare. Emma Guttman-Yassky declares the following conflicts of interest: AbbVie, Almirall, Amgen, AnaptysBio, Asana Biosciences, Boehringer Ingelheim, Cara Therapeutics, Celgene, Concert, DBV, Dermira, Dermavant, DS Biopharma, Eli Lilly, EMD Serono, Escalier, Galderma, Glenmark, Innovaderm, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Kiniksa, Kyowa Kirin, LEO Pharma, Mitsubishi Tanabe, Novan, Pfizer, Ralexar, RAPT Therapeutics, Regeneron, Sanofi, Sienna Biopharma, UCB, and Union Therapeutics. Tiago Torres declares the following conflicts of interest: AbbVie, Amgen, Almirall, Arena Pharmaceuticals, Boehringer Ingelheim, Bristol Myers Squibb, Celgene, Janssen, Biocad, LEO Pharma, Eli Lilly, MSD, Novartis, Pfizer, Samsung-Bioepis, Sanofi-Genzyme and Sandoz.

Author contributions

EF, EG, and TT had the idea for the article, performed the literature search and data analysis, and drafted and critically revised the work.

Ethics approval

Not applicable.

Consent to participate/publish

Not applicable.

Availability of data and material

Not applicable.

Code Availability

Not applicable.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Freitas, E., Guttman-Yassky, E. & Torres, T. Tralokinumab for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis. Am J Clin Dermatol (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40257-021-00613-8

Download citation