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Evaluation of the predictive value of different dietary antioxidant capacity assessment methods on healthy and unhealthy phenotype in overweight and obese women

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Abstract

Purpose

Predictive value of different dietary antioxidant capacity assessment methods on healthy and unhealthy phenotypes in overweight and obese women is still unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the predictive value of different dietary antioxidant capacity assessment methods on healthy and unhealthy phenotypes in overweight and obese women.

Methods

A total of 290 overweight and obese women were included in this cross-sectional study. Food intake was assessed using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Dietary antioxidant capacity was calculated using valid databases of antioxidant value. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve method was used to evaluate the predictive value of antioxidant capacity indices, including dietary antioxidant quality score (DAQS), ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), total reactive antioxidant potential (TRAP), and trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC).

Results

The results showed that the highest area under the ROC curve for predicting metabolically healthy obesity (MHO) belongs to the TRAP method (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.53). In addition, this method had the highest AUC for predicting inflammatory marker of C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (AUC = 0.54) and the index of the homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (AUC = 0.59). The highest AUC for triglyceride prediction was related to the DAQS method (AUC = 0.56). Moreover, a significant correlation of FRAP (r = −0.15, P = 0.02), TRAP (r = −0.19, P < 0.001), TEAC (r = −0.18, P< 0.001) with HOMA-IR was reached.

Conclusion

The findings of this study show that the best way to predict the status of MHO is TRAP method. This method is also the best predictor of hs-CRP and HOMA-IR. DAQS method is the best predictor for TG.

Research highlights

  1. 1.

    The best way to predict the status of metabolically healthy obese (MHO) is total reactive antioxidant potential (TRAP) method.

  2. 2.

    TRAP method is the best predictor of hs-CRP and HOMA-IR.

  3. 3.

    Dietary antioxidant quality score (DAQS) method is the best predictor for triglyceride.

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Fig. 1
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Data availability

The data generated or analyzed during the current study are not publicly available but are available from the corresponding author upon reasonable request.

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Acknowledgements

The authors thank the laboratory of Nutrition Sciences and Dietetics in Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS). We are grateful to all of the participants for their contribution to this research. This study was supported by grants from the Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran, Iran (Grant’s ID: IR.TUMS.MEDICINE.REC.1399.205). All participants signed a written informed consent that was approved by this committee prior to enrollment in the study.

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Correspondence to Khadijeh Mirzaei.

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This study was supported by grants from the Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran, Iran (Grant’s ID: IR.TUMS.MEDICINE.REC.1399.205).

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The authors declare that they did not have any conflict of interest.

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Noori, S., Keshavarz, S.A., Yekaninejad, M.S. et al. Evaluation of the predictive value of different dietary antioxidant capacity assessment methods on healthy and unhealthy phenotype in overweight and obese women. J Diabetes Metab Disord 21, 1641–1650 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40200-022-01115-y

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40200-022-01115-y

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