Establishment of biobank facility at Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Institute of Iran: experiences, challenges, and future outlook

Abstract

Biobanking as an emerging procedure referring to the development of sample storage technologies which provide essential structures for conducting research. This paper presents the experiences and challenges faced while establishing the non-communicable diseases (NCDs)-dedicated biobank at Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Institute (EMRI) in Iran, such as infrastructure, Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS), ethical and legal aspects, sample collection, preservation, and quality control (QC). NCDs are a major health problem around the world and in Iran, which is access to biological samples are required to understanding and planning to these diseases. The main objectives of the EMRI biobank is currently the collection and storage of biological samples such as blood, serum, plasma, urine and DNA from patients with NCDs including diabetes mellitus osteoporosis and elderly population based on cohort and cross-sectional studies. The biobank of EMRI aims to have a major impact on the NCDs by supplying biological samples for national and international research projects.

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Abbreviations

NCDs:

Non-communicable diseases

EMRI:

Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Institute

LIMS:

Laboratory Information Management System

QC:

quality control

IARC:

International Agency for Cancer Research

ISBER:

International Society for Biological and Environmental Repositories

HIS:

Hospital Information System

SOPs:

Standard Operating Procedures

WHO:

World Health Organization

ETB:

Endocrine Tumor Bank

EPSS:

Emergency Power Supply Systems

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Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful to Mrs. Hajipour for her English language comments on the initial draft of the manuscript. Also, the authors are thankful to Mrs. Sahar Jahangiri for her helpful suggestions and advice. The authors also thank the World Health Organization (WHO), as recognized in the references, for providing permission to reprint the free data.

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Correspondence to Vahid Haghpanah or Bagher Larijani.

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Parichehreh-Dizaji, S., Samimi, H., Asadolahpour, E. et al. Establishment of biobank facility at Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Institute of Iran: experiences, challenges, and future outlook. J Diabetes Metab Disord (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40200-021-00781-8

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Keywords

  • Biobank
  • Non‐communicable diseases
  • Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Institute
  • Tehran University of Medical Sciences
  • Iran