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Nutritional Supplements for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

  • Therapies in Age-Related Macular Degeneration (R. Goldhardt, Section Editor)
  • Published:
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Abstract

The Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) and The Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2, are the only large-scale, long-term, randomized controlled trials to demonstrate a role of nutritional supplements in reducing risk of progression to advanced forms of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This review summarizes the study design, main results, and implications of these trials in the clinical care of nonexudative AMD patients. In addition, it discusses other recent prospective studies focusing on efficacy of nutritional supplementation for prevention or slowing progression of AMD as well as briefly discusses possible effect of genotypes on response to AREDS supplementation.

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Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: • Of importance •• Of major importance

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Disclosure

Dr. Gregori and Dr. Goldhardt do not have any conflicts of interests to disclose.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

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Correspondence to Ninel Z. Gregori.

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This article is part of the Topical Collection on Therapies in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

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Gregori, N.Z., Goldhardt, R. Nutritional Supplements for Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Curr Ophthalmol Rep 3, 34–39 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40135-014-0059-z

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40135-014-0059-z

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