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International Aquatic Research

, Volume 11, Issue 4, pp 323–324 | Cite as

Correction to: Effect of three types of liquid compost combined with Avicennia marina leaves on growth and survival of tiger prawns (Penaeus monodon)

  • Restiana Wisnu AriyatiEmail author
  • Sri Rejeki
  • Lestari L. Widowati
  • Tita Elfitasari
  • Roel H. Bosma
Open Access
Correction

Correction to: Int Aquat Res  https://doi.org/10.1007/s40071-019-00239-x

Due to the author’s omission to check the corrections by the journal’ imposed reviewer of English style.

Please read the following sections and Tables as follows:

Abstract The sustainability of prawn farming in brackish water ponds is controversial because of low yields and mangrove clearing. Low yields are due mostly to insufficient preparation of pond bottoms. Mangrove trees are often planted on pond bunds as window dressing. This study examined the effect of three types of liquid compost from vegetables, fruit, and both vegetables and fruit in tanks to which whole or chopped Avicenia marina leaves were added to mimic local pond conditions. In a split-plot design, 28 square tanks were each stocked with one hundred 15-day-old post-larvae tiger prawns (Penaeus monodon). Four tanks were used as controls and 24 were assigned to the treatments, 12 with whole and 12 with chopped leaves. In both of these 12, 4 received liquid compost from vegetables, 4 from fruits and 4 from their mixture. Shrimp were weighed at the start, halfway and end of the 50-day trial, and fed at 5% of the estimated total weight; survival was counted at the end. The survival rates of treatments and controls (65–76%) were not significantly different. Shrimp in water with vegetable compost grew significantly faster (2.7% day−1) than in both treatments with fruit (2.5% day−1). Shrimp in all treatments grew significantly faster than those in the controls (2.0% day−1). The lower growth rate of shrimp fed fruit compost may have been due to dinoflagellates, which are known to negatively affect shrimp. Shrimp in tanks with chopped leaves of A. marina grew slightly better than shrimp in tanks with whole leaves.

On page 3, just above ‘Data collection and calculation”:

“The post-larva shrimp were fed with commercial pellets at 5% of total body weight, estimated at the start and halfway the study. To encourage shrimp to use the natural feed produced in the tanks, …”

Table 1 Multifactorial split-plot ANOVA on the effects of mangrove leaves and compost type on P. monodon SR

Source of variation

df

MS

F

Sig.

Intercept

1

125,778

7843

0.08

Mangrove leaves type

1

9.4

0.89

0.79

Repetition

4

32,994

0.61

0.62

Liquid compost type

2

211

1.75

0.22

Mangrove * compost

2

0.9

0.007

0.99

Table 2 Multifactorial split-plot ANOVA on the effects of mangrove leaves and compost type on P. monodon SGR

Source of variation

df

MS

F

Sig.

Intercept

1

84.8

16,737

0.00

Mangrove leaves type

1

1.04

28.8

0.01

Repetition

4

0.01

0.16

0.95

Compost type

12

0.73

32.5

0.00

Mangrove * compost

12

0.01

0.20

0.82

Table 5 Plankton species counts in the water of the six treatments and the indexes for plankton diversity, uniformity, and dominance

Plankton

A1B1

A1B2

A1B3

A2B1

A2B2

A2B3

Total count (n mL−1)

7498

8941

12,688

8651

9517

11,823

Bacillariophyceae

   

 Rhizosolenia sp.

865

2019

1730

865

2019

2019

 Pleurosygma sp.

577

865

3749

2019

1442

3749

 Synedra sp.

2019

2019

2019

1442

1730

2307

 Thalassiotrix sp.

577

577

 Coscinoduscus sp.

1153

1442

1153

1442

1442

865

 Guinardia sp.

1442

 Nitzschia sp.

288

865

1153

Dinophyceae

   

 Ceratium sp.

577

288

 Peridinium sp.

865

288

577

Cyanophyceae

   

 Oscillatoria sp.

1730

2019

1730

2019

2019

1153

Diversity index H′

1.44

1.59

1.90

1.58

1.59

1.78

Uniformity index e′

0.69

0.77

0.92

0.76

0.76

0.85

Domination index D

0.07

0.11

0.20

0.10

0.11

0.19

Notes

Acknowledgements

We heartily appreciate the Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Sciences, University of Diponegoro, for contributing to this research through NON-APBN Research Grant no. 2300/UN.7.3.10/LT/2017. We acknowledge the PASMI project, funded mainly by NWO-WOTRO (Grant No. W 08.260.303), for providing the water quality measurement equipment and the cultivation facilities we used in this study. Our thanks goes also to Dr Lorna Mira Calumpang for reviewing the English grammar and style, and to all our colleagues who assisted us in conducting this research until its completion.

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Aquaculture Department, Faculty of Fisheries and Marine SciencesDiponegoro UniversitySemarangIndonesia
  2. 2.Aquaculture and Fisheries GroupWageningen UniversityWageningenThe Netherlands

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