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Molecular and Cytogenetic Characterization of Fish Cell Lines and its Application in Aquatic Research

Abstract

Fish cell line has emerged as an important tool in fishery biotechnology. In recent years, various fish cell lines have been developed by different researchers across the country. National Repository on Fish cell lines, established with the aim to preserve fish cell lines for training and education to stakeholders, has started functioning at National Bureau of Fish Genetic Resources, Lucknow. This repository is supposed to characterize and preserve the fish cell lines developed across the country and serve as a national referral centre for Indian and exotic fish cell lines. Currently, the repository is maintaining 50 fish cell lines deposited by various research institutes in India, including the cell lines developed at cell culture facility of National Bureau of Fish Genetic Resources. The cell lines have been successfully cryopreserved after verifying its authenticity by sequence analysis of two mitochondrial genes, viz. 16S rRNA and cytochrome c oxidase sub-unit I. Chromosomal analysis, transfection efficiency and immunocytochemistry are also being used to characterize the cell lines. The facility is serviceable for the collection, deposition and distribution of fish cell lines. This paper discusses the status as well as the methodology adopted for fish cell lines development, characterization and storage at NRFC.

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Acknowledgments

The Department of Biotechnology, Government of India is thankfully acknowledged for the financial support. The authors also thank the Director, NBFGR for providing research facilities.

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Correspondence to Ravindra Kumar.

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Nagpure, N.S., Mishra, A.K., Ninawe, A.S. et al. Molecular and Cytogenetic Characterization of Fish Cell Lines and its Application in Aquatic Research. Natl. Acad. Sci. Lett. 39, 11–16 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40009-015-0365-5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40009-015-0365-5

Keywords

  • Cell line repository
  • Cryopreservation
  • Fish cell line
  • Molecular characterization