Human Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes: A Key Player in Wound Healing

Abstract

Background:

Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs) are an attractive resource for wound healing because their regenerative capacity improves injury repair. Recently, stem cell-derived exosomes have been shown to play a positive role in stem cell-based therapies. However, the effects of exosomes derived from AMSCs (AEXOs) on wound healing are unclear. In this study, we aimed to examine the role of AEXOs in attenuating inflammation and explore their effects in normal wound healing.

Methods:

We isolated exosomes from AMSCs and established a cellular model of inflammation by treatment with the inflammatory cytokines, interferon gamma and tumor necrosis factor alpha, to determine whether AEXOs can inhibit inflammation. We examined the wound healing effects of AEXOs in in vitro wound healing models and performed a miRNA array to understand the role of AEXOs in inflammation and wound healing.

Results:

A significant difference was observed in wound closure and the expression of anti-inflammatory and wound-healing-related factors between control and AEXO-treated cells.

Conclusion:

Our results showed that besides alleviating the inflammation response, AEXOs also promote wound healing. Thus, AEXOs represent a novel, stem-cell-based, therapeutic strategy for wound healing.

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Acknowledgement

This research was funded by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grant funded by the Korea government (MSIT) (No. 2019R1C1C1007036).

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Correspondence to Seung Yong Song or Hyun Ok Kim.

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The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board at Severance Hospital (IRB No. 4-2019-0060).

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Heo, J.S., Kim, S., Yang, C.E. et al. Human Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes: A Key Player in Wound Healing. Tissue Eng Regen Med (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13770-020-00316-x

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Keywords

  • Adipose-derived stem cells
  • Exosomes
  • Inflammation
  • Wound healing