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Application of a Collagen Patch Derived from Duck Feet in Acute Tympanic Membrane Perforation

  • Soo Hyeon Kim
  • Ju Yeon Jeong
  • Hyun Jung Park
  • Bo Mi Moon
  • Ye Ri Park
  • Ok Joo Lee
  • Md Tipu Sultan
  • Dong-Kyu Kim
  • Hae Sang Park
  • Jun Ho LeeEmail author
  • Chan Hum ParkEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

We investigated the utility of the duck-feet collagen extraction patching procedure in the traumatic tympanic membrane (TM) perforation via a comparison with spontaneous healing or paper patch. Fifty-six ears of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, each weighing in the range of 250 to 300 g, were used for the animal studies. Sixteen rats had one-side ear in the control group and the opposite-side ear in the treated groups. The remaining twelve rats had a one-side ear with the duck-feet collagen patch and the opposite-side ear with a paper patch. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression cells were calculated among the 200 basal cells, and the expression percentage was identified as the labeling index. The healing of the perforation in the duck-feet collagen patch group was confirmed to be more rapid compared to the healing of the other groups. PCNA staining was observed in the migrating portion of PCNA enhanced cell to collagen scaffold in Post operative day (POD) 7 of collagen patch group. Thus, the adhesive effect of the duck-feet collagen patch to perforated margin was better than that of the paper patch. After completing the healing process, the collagen patch shrank and detached from the tympanic membrane (POD 14). In this study, we confirmed that the use of a duck-feet collagen patch had the advantage of early healing, inducing natural TM contour, and disappearing ability after the patch effect is complete.

Keywords

Middle ear Tympanic membrane perforation Duck’s feet Fibroin 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by a grant from Hallym University Research Fund and Technology Commercialization Support Program (814005-03-3-HD030), Ministry for Food, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Republic of Korea.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors have no financial relationships or conflict of interest to disclosure.

Ethical statement

This research protocol was approved by the Hallym University institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IRB no. Hallym 2014-103), and the experiments were performed in compliance with the ARRIVE guidelines on animal research.

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Copyright information

© The Korean Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Society and Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Soo Hyeon Kim
    • 1
  • Ju Yeon Jeong
    • 1
  • Hyun Jung Park
    • 1
  • Bo Mi Moon
    • 1
  • Ye Ri Park
    • 1
  • Ok Joo Lee
    • 1
  • Md Tipu Sultan
    • 1
  • Dong-Kyu Kim
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hae Sang Park
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jun Ho Lee
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Chan Hum Park
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Nano-Bio Regenerative Medical InstituteHallym UniversityChuncheonRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, School of MedicineHallym UniversityChuncheonRepublic of Korea

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