Optimizing the nutrient feeding strategy for PHA production by a novel strain of Enterobacter sp.

Abstract

The influence of nutrient limitation on polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) accumulation was studied using a novel PHA-producing strain of Enterobacter sp. The effect of N/C ratio on growth and accumulation of PHA was studied by varying the ratio from 0.02 to 0.1. Biomass concentration, dry cell weight, protein content and the amount of PHA accumulated were estimated for each N/C ratio. It was found that the increase in N/C ratio resulted in increase in culture concentration up to 3.25 g/l of dry cell weight. Polyhydroxyalkanoate concentration was found to be maximum at N/C ratio of 0.04 (67.8 µg/ml), and further increase in N/C ratio resulted in lesser amount of PHA. Analytical procedures such as FTIR and NMR were done to validate the obtained PHA biopolymer.

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Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank the management of Kumaraguru College of Technology for the research facilities provided and Mr. M. Shanmugaprakash and Dr. Vinohar Stephen Rapheal for their invaluable help during the work.

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Correspondence to J. Aravind.

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Vinish, V., Sangeetha, S.H., Aravind, J. et al. Optimizing the nutrient feeding strategy for PHA production by a novel strain of Enterobacter sp.. Int. J. Environ. Sci. Technol. 12, 2757–2764 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13762-015-0784-3

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Keywords

  • PHA
  • Novel strain
  • Enterobacter sp.
  • Nutrient limitation
  • N/C ratio
  • FTIR
  • NMR