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Neurological disease in the aftermath of terrorism: a review

Abstract

The purpose of our review is to discuss current knowledge on long-term sequelae and neurological disorders in the aftermath of a terrorist attack. The specific aspects of both psychological and physical effects are mentioned in more detail in this review. Also, the outcomes such as stress-related disorders, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegenerative disease are explained. Moreover, PTSD and posttraumatic structural brain changes are a topic for further investigations of the patients suffering from these attacks. Not only the direct victims are prone to the after effects of the terroristic attacks, but the rescue workers, physicians, witnesses and worldwide citizens may also be affected by PTSD and other neurological diseases as well. The determination of a whole series of risk factors for developing neurological disorders can be a means to set up early detection, preventative measures, to refine treatment and thus to gain better outcome in the future.

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Correspondence to Harald De Cauwer.

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De Cauwer, H., Somville, F.J.M.P. Neurological disease in the aftermath of terrorism: a review. Acta Neurol Belg 118, 193–199 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13760-018-0924-x

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Keywords

  • Posttraumatic stress disorder
  • Terrorism
  • After effects
  • Stroke
  • Epilepsy
  • Neurodegenerative diseases