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Matrix metalloproteinases and their pathological upregulation in multiple sclerosis: an overview

Abstract

Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of extracellular proteases associated with extracellular matrix remodeling. They are involved in many physiological and reparative processes. MMPs can break down all extracellular constituents; therefore, their expression is very tightly regulated and their abnormal activity or over production has been linked to many diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS) which is a leading cause of non-traumatic disability in young adults in North America. Recently many studies, both in animals and humans, have been conducted to better elucidate the underlying causes, mechanisms and pathophysiology of MS. In this review, we discuss the potential role of pathological upregulation of MMPs in MS and future challenges which if properly addressed might help in development of potential cure for this disease.

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The authors confirm that there are no known conflicts of interest associated with this publication and there has been no significant financial support for this work that could have influenced its outcome.

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Correspondence to Mohamed-Nur Abdallah.

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Javaid, M.A., Abdallah, MN., Ahmed, A.S. et al. Matrix metalloproteinases and their pathological upregulation in multiple sclerosis: an overview. Acta Neurol Belg 113, 381–390 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13760-013-0239-x

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13760-013-0239-x

Keywords

  • Matrix metalloproteinases
  • Extracellular matrix
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis