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Relationships between edema degree and clinical and biochemical parameters in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: a preliminary study

Abstract

The objective of the study was to investigate the associations between the degree of edema with the clinical and biochemical parameters such as serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), albumin (ALB) in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) patients. Forty-nine patients with typical clinical symptoms and characteristic MR imaging findings of PRES were included in this study. Lactate dehydrogenase and ALB were analyzed with the immunoluminometric assays. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images were used to evaluate the distribution of the extent or severity of vasogenic edema by two observers. Correlation analysis between the scores of brain edema and the blood pressures, clinical conditions and biochemical parameters was performed. No significant difference of brain edema score was found between patients with eclampsia, chronic renal failure and other clinical condition (P > 0.05). Both mean arterial pressures and LDH level were moderately correlated with the scores of brain edema distribution (Spearman’s ρ test, r = 0.405 and 0.497, respectively, P < 0.01). Serum ALB level was not correlated with the scores of brain edema distribution (P > 0.05). Larger and more diffuse lesions may be predicted by higher LDH level and blood pressure. The overall severity of the systemic process might be predicted by the degree of edema expression in PRES.

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Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Yantai Science and Technology Development Planning program (No. 2008142-4). The authors acknowledge the assistance of Dr. Ri-ming Liu in laboratory test.

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Correspondence to Lv Cui.

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Bo, G., Hui, L., Feng-li, L. et al. Relationships between edema degree and clinical and biochemical parameters in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: a preliminary study. Acta Neurol Belg 112, 281–285 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13760-012-0060-y

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13760-012-0060-y

Keywords

  • Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES)
  • Hypertension
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
  • Brain edema
  • Biological markers
  • Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)