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New Dietary Supplements for Obesity: What We Currently Know

Abstract

Obesity and its associated cardiometabolic alterations currently are considered an epidemic; thus, their treatment is of major importance. The cornerstone for such treatment involves therapeutic lifestyle changes; however, the vast majority of cases fail and/or significant weight loss is maintained only in the short term because of lack of compliance. The popularity of dietary supplements for weight management has increased, and a wide variety of these products are available over the counter. However, the existing scientific evidence is insufficient to recommend their safe use. Hence, the purpose of this article is to review the clinical effects, proposed mechanism of action, and safety profile of some of the new dietary supplements, including white bean extract, Garcinia cambogia, bitter orange, Hoodia gordonii, forskolin, green coffee, glucomannan, β-glucans, chitosan, guar gum, and raspberry ketones.

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Correspondence to Gabriela Gutiérrez-Salmeán.

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Alejandro Ríos-Hoyo and Gabriela Gutiérrez-Salmeán declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Ríos-Hoyo, A., Gutiérrez-Salmeán, G. New Dietary Supplements for Obesity: What We Currently Know. Curr Obes Rep 5, 262–270 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13679-016-0214-y

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Keywords

  • Dietary supplements
  • Obesity
  • Weight loss