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Dietary Interventions to Prevent or Delay Alzheimer’s Disease: What the Evidence Shows

Abstract

Purpose of Review

A variety of potentially modifiable risk factors have been investigated in an attempt to delay/prevent Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Among these, dietary regimens and nutritional supplements have been most extensively studied. The purpose of this article is to critically review recent evidence for the Mediterranean/MIND diets along with the use of various vitamins and popular herbal supplements, including curcumin, Ginkgo biloba, and fish oil, among others.

Recent Findings

The Mediterranean and MIND diets are supported by observational studies performed in community settings, especially in the group with high adherence to the Mediterranean diet and with moderate–high adherence to the MIND diet. Randomized controlled trials of various vitamins and supplements have, in general, not shown statistically significant results, although there has been some promising evidence for vitamin D supplementation and curcumin use.

Summary

There is sufficient data to recommend the Mediterranean and MIND diets to delay the onset of AD. It is judicious to supplement vitamin D, especially in deficient patients, and to consider the use of curcumin to improve cognitive performance. Future research should focus on larger, controlled trials in diverse populations.

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Bartochowski, Z., Conway, J., Wallach, Y. et al. Dietary Interventions to Prevent or Delay Alzheimer’s Disease: What the Evidence Shows. Curr Nutr Rep 9, 210–225 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13668-020-00333-1

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Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease and nutrition
  • Mediterranean diet and cognition
  • Vitamins and supplements in AD
  • Dietary interventions in AD
  • MIND diet and Alzheimer’s disease
  • Microbiota and Alzheimer’s disease