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Food and Mood: the Corresponsive Effect

Abstract

Purpose of Review

The question whether food choice and eating behavior influence the mood or are influenced by the mood has been inquisitive to scientists and researchers. The purpose of this review is to support or refuse the argument that mood is affected by food or vice versa.

Recent Findings

The association between food and mood has been comprehensively elucidated in this review based on several studies that include participants from different ages, cultural backgrounds, and health status. The correlation among food, mood, and diseases such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, and depression was thoroughly investigated. The effect of different foods and nutrients on the mood was further explained. It is concluded that the mood significantly affects food intake and food choices. On the other hand, food also influences the mood, which affects the diseases either positively or negatively.

Summary

Appropriate food choices play a significant role in mood enhancement. Advertisement is another crucial factor that negatively affects food choices and mood and contributes to many diseases. Understanding the interaction between food and mood can help to prevent or alleviate undesired health issues.

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W.A. and F.A. drafted the initial version of the manuscript. R.K. reviewed, evaluated, and analyzed the content and prepared the final version. All authors approved the final version sharing the responsibility for ensuring the manuscript complies with the journal style requirements and terms of consideration.

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Correspondence to Rabie Y. Khattab.

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Welayah A. AlAmmar, Fatima H. Albeesh, and Rabie Y. Khattab declare they have no conflict of interest.

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AlAmmar, W.A., Albeesh, F.H. & Khattab, R.Y. Food and Mood: the Corresponsive Effect. Curr Nutr Rep 9, 296–308 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13668-020-00331-3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13668-020-00331-3

Keywords

  • Food
  • Mood;Diseases;Healthy choices