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Donor-Derived Disease Transmission in Lung Transplantation

Abstract

Purpose of Review

Understanding the risk of donor-derived infection, particularly in the lung transplant population, should reduce discarding organs without risk. Ongoing regulatory efforts and improved clinician awareness can help improve organ supply and post-transplantation outcomes.

Recent Findings

Infections can be divided into expected and unexpected. Syndromes that manifest in the early-post-transplant period should raise concern of a donor-derived transmission. Emerging data suggests that donors with certain bacterial infections can be safely used while donors with HCV infection can be a useful source of previously discarded organs.

Summary

Donor-derived disease transmission events are rare. Thoughtful donor and recipient screening can mitigate the risk of disease transmission through organ transplantation and may identify donor organs that can be safely used.

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References

Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: • Of importance •• Of major importance

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Correspondence to Michael G. Ison.

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Michael Ison reports personal fees from Shionogi, personal fees from Celltrion, grants and personal fees from Genetech/Roche, grants and personal fees from Janssen, personal fees from Seqirus, personal fees from Viracor Eurofins, personal fees from VirBio, grants from Emergent BioSolutions, during the conduct of the study, and Payments to Northwestern University by AiCuris, Chimerix, Gilead, and Shire for research. He reports being a non-paid consultant for GlaxoSmithKlein, Romark, and Vertex.

Scott Roberts declares no conflict of interest.

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Roberts, S.C., Ison, M.G. Donor-Derived Disease Transmission in Lung Transplantation. Curr Pulmonol Rep 9, 1–9 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13665-020-00245-z

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13665-020-00245-z

Keywords

  • Lung transplantation
  • Donor-derived infection
  • Disease
  • Screening
  • Donation