Identification of unique alleles and assessment of genetic diversity of rabi sorghum accessions using simple sequence repeat markers

Abstract

Genetic diversity among 42 sorghum accessions representing landraces (19), advanced breeding lines (16), local cultivars (2) and release varieties (5) with 30 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers revealed 7.6 mean number of alleles per locus showing 93.3% polymorphism and an average polymorphism information content of 0.78 which range from 0.22 (Xtxp12) and 0.91(Xtxp321). The average heterozygosity and effective number of alleles per locus were 0.8 and 6.65 respectively. Cluster analysis based on microsatellite allelic diversity clearly demarcated the accessions into ten clusters. A total of 24 unique alleles were obtained from seven SSR loci in 23 accessions in a size range of 110–380 bp; these unique alleles may serve as diagnostic tools for particular region of the genome of respective genotypes. Selected SSR markers from different linkage groups provided an accurate way of determining genetic diversity at the molecular level.

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Abbreviations

MDS:

multidimensional scaling

PIC:

polymorphism information content

CTAB:

cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide

UPGMA:

unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average

SSR:

simple sequence repeats

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Acknowledgements

Financial assistance was from Ministry of Information Technology and Biotechnology, Government of Karnataka, and Department of Biotechnology, Government of India. We are thankful Dr M.Y. Kamatar, and Dr M. G. Palakshappa for providing sorghum accessions and Dr. N. Seetharama, Director, National Research Center for Sorghum, Hyderabad, India, for encouragement. We thank anonymous reviewers for their critical comments which helped improving the scientific merit of the manuscript.

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Correspondence to Bashasab Fakrudin.

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Thudi, M., Fakrudin, B. Identification of unique alleles and assessment of genetic diversity of rabi sorghum accessions using simple sequence repeat markers. J. Plant Biochem. Biotechnol. 20, 74–83 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13562-010-0028-z

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Keywords

  • Polymorphism information content
  • Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR)
  • Fingerprint
  • Heterozygosity
  • Effective number of alleles
  • Landrace