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Exploring differences in practicing teachers’ knowledge use in a dynamic and static proportional task

Abstract

Teachers’ knowledge of proportional reasoning is important, particularly in the middle grades in the USA. This exploratory study investigated 32 teachers’ use of knowledge resources in two mathematically similar tasks (one a paper and pencil task, the other a dynamic task) around proportional reasoning. The two tasks invoked different knowledge resources by the same teachers. Results suggest questions to the field around how we access or invoke teacher knowledge and the need to more purposefully explore the potential benefits of using a dynamic task to invoke knowledge resources.

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Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank Travis Weiland, James Burke, and Gili Nagar for their support in data collection and analysis.

Funding

The work reported here was supported by the National Science Foundation under grants DRL-1621290 and DRL-1054170.

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Correspondence to Rachael Eriksen Brown.

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Brown, R.E., Orrill, C.H. & Park, J. Exploring differences in practicing teachers’ knowledge use in a dynamic and static proportional task. Math Ed Res J (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13394-020-00350-x

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Keywords

  • Proportional reasoning
  • Knowledge resources
  • Teacher knowledge
  • Representations