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Teacher moves for supporting student reasoning

Abstract

Teachers play a critical role in supporting students’ mathematical engagement. There is evidence that meaningful student engagement occurs more often in student-centered classrooms, in which the teacher and the students mutually share mathematical authority. However, teacher-centered instruction continues to dominate classroom discourse, and teachers struggle to effectively support student inquiry. This paper presents a framework of teacher moves specific to inquiry-oriented instruction, the Teacher Moves for Supporting Student Reasoning (TMSSR) framework. Based on the analysis of four instructors’ implementations of a middle grades (ages 12–14) research-based unit on ratio and linear functions, the TMSSR framework organizes pedagogical moves into four categories, eliciting, responding, facilitating, and extending, and then places individual moves within each category on a continuum according to their potential for supporting student reasoning. In this manner, the TMSSR framework characterizes how multiple teacher moves can work together to foster an inquiry-oriented environment. We detail the framework with data examples and then present a classroom episode exemplifying the framework’s operation.

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Ellis, A., Özgür, Z. & Reiten, L. Teacher moves for supporting student reasoning. Math Ed Res J 31, 107–132 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13394-018-0246-6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13394-018-0246-6

Keywords

  • Mathematics teacher education
  • Classroom discussion
  • Teacher moves
  • Algebra