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Mathematics Education Research Journal

, Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 25–43 | Cite as

Lessons in financial literacy task design: authentic, imaginable, useful

  • Carly SawatzkiEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

As part of ongoing design-based research exploring financial literacy teaching and learning, 10 tasks termed “financial dilemmas” were trialled by 14 teachers and more than 300 year 5 and 6 students in four government primary schools in urban Darwin. Drawing on data related to three tasks—Catching the bus, Laser Tag and Buying bread—this article explores insights into problem context and task design principles. The findings highlight that fit to circumstance, challenge yet accessibility and pedagogical architecture are important task design principles. Further, tasks involving unfamiliar, novel and imaginable problem contexts, while pedagogically demanding for teachers, can be considered useful by students and have the potential to broaden their horizons.

Keywords

Realistic mathematics Numeracy Task design Financial literacy Problem solving 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The EPMC project is funded through an Australian Research Council Discovery Project (DP110101027). The views expressed are those of the author. The project acknowledges the generous participation of the project schools.

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Copyright information

© Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia, Inc. 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of EducationMonash UniversityClaytonAustralia

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