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A two-layered suspension (particle-fluid) model for non-Newtonian fluid flow in a catheterized arterial stenosis with slip condition at the wall of stenosed artery

Abstract

The primary concern of the present investigation is to study blood flow in a porous catheterized artery with an axially asymmetric and radially symmetric stenosis (constriction). In the present study, blood is characterized as a two-fluid system containing a cell-rich zone of suspension of blood cells described to be a particle-fluid suspension (Jeffrey fluid) and a cell-free plasma (Newtonian fluid) layer near the wall. The systematic expressions for flow characteristics such as fluid phase and particle phase velocities, flow rate, wall shear stress, resistive force, and frictional forces on walls of arterial stenosis and catheter are derived. It is recorded that the wall shear stress, flow resistance, and frictional forces are found to be increased with catheter size, red cell concentration, and slip parameter. When blood obeys the law of constitutive equation of a Jeffrey fluid, the flowing blood experiences lesser wall shear stress, flow resistance and frictional forces as compared to the case of blood being categorized as a Newtonian fluid. The increase in Darcy number, blood rheology as Jeffrey fluid, and the presence of peripheral plasma layer near the wall serves to reduce substantially the values of the flow characteristics (wall shear stress, flow resistance and frictional forces).

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Ponalagusamy, R. A two-layered suspension (particle-fluid) model for non-Newtonian fluid flow in a catheterized arterial stenosis with slip condition at the wall of stenosed artery. Korea-Aust. Rheol. J. 29, 87–100 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13367-017-0011-5

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Keywords

  • blood flow
  • Jeffrey fluid
  • erythrocytes
  • suspension
  • plasma layer
  • stenosis
  • catheter tube
  • slip
  • porous