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Description of the Asian chili pod gall midge, Asphondylia capsicicola sp. n., with comparative notes on Asphondylia gennadii (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) that induces the same sort of pod gall on the same host plant species in the Mediterranean region

Abstract

A new species of the genus Asphondylia (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) that infests pods of chili, Capsicum annuum L. and Capsicum frutescens L. (Solanaceae), is described as Asphondylia capsicicola sp. n. based on specimens collected from Indonesia and Vietnam. The new species is similar to Asphondylia gennadii (Marchal) (=Asphondylia capsici) that induces chili pod galls in the Mediterranean region, but is distinguishable from it by the morphological features of pupa such as the nonlinear arrangement of the lower frontal horns, and the narrower longitudinal band of transverse wrinkles on the tergite of the mesothorax. Differences between the two species in the DNA sequencing data were 69 bp (16%) to 77 bp (19%) among 413 bp of the partial cytochrome oxidase subunit I region examined, supporting the morphological identification. This is one of the examples in which two congeners induce the same sort of gall on the same host plant organ and species, which means that the two species are not distinguishable based solely on gall shape and host plant information, unlike many other gall midges.

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Acknowledgments

We express our thanks to Dr R. J. Gagné (Systematic Entomology Laboratory, Plant Science Institute, US Department of Agriculture) for his critical reading of an early draft. We are grateful to the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) and Dr I. A. Purwito (Dean, Faculty of Agriculture, Bogor Agricultural University) for allowing us to survey and examine the Asian chili pod gall midge in Indonesia and to Dr K. Takasu (Kyushu University) for giving us an opportunity to investigate the gall midge in Vietnam. Our thanks are also due to Dr T. Partomihardjo, the late Dr H. Simbolon (Botanical Division, Research Centre for Biology, LIPI), Dr P. O. Ngakan (Hasanuddin University), Dr R. Rustam (Riau University), Dr Tran Tan Viet, Dr Nguyen Huu Truc and Dr Nguyen Chau Nien (Faculty of Agronomy, Nong Lam University, Ho Chi Minh City), Mr F. Kodoi, Mr I. Kagiyama and Mr T. Higuchi (former students of Kyushu University) for their help in field surveys, and Mr Ayman K. Elsayed (Kagoshima University) for his help with the morphological observations. This study was supported mainly by a research fund granted in 2002 to J. Y. from the Yamazaki Spice Incorporated Foundation and partly by JSPS KAKENHI grant numbers JP11691192 to J. Y. and JP15K07330 to N. U., J. Y and W. K.

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Correspondence to Nami Uechi.

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This article is registered in ZooBank under urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub: CC328260-9005-4761-ADBC-0216CD439E29.

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Uechi, N., Yukawa, J., Tokuda, M. et al. Description of the Asian chili pod gall midge, Asphondylia capsicicola sp. n., with comparative notes on Asphondylia gennadii (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) that induces the same sort of pod gall on the same host plant species in the Mediterranean region. Appl Entomol Zool 52, 113–123 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13355-016-0461-0

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13355-016-0461-0

Keywords

  • Capsicum annuum
  • Capsicum frutescens
  • Lower frontal horns
  • Pupal morphology
  • New species
  • Genetic analysis