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Diabetology International

, Volume 8, Issue 4, pp 392–396 | Cite as

A pilot study of short-term toe resistance training in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

  • Hiroaki Kataoka
  • Nobuyuki Miyatake
  • Naomi Kitayama
  • Satoshi Murao
  • Satoshi Tanaka
Short Communication

Abstract

Objective

The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the effect of short-term toe resistance training on toe pinch force and toe muscle quality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Methods

A total of 12 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were hospitalized to improve glycemic control (8 men and 4 women, duration of diabetes 12.2 ± 9.5 years) were enrolled in this pilot study. Exercise therapy was performed with conventional aerobic exercise and four newly developed toe resistance training exercises for 2 weeks. Changes in anthropometric parameters, blood pressure (BP), heart rate, and muscle parameters, i.e. muscle mass, toe pinch force and toe muscle quality were evaluated after the exercise program.

Results

There were no significant differences of body weight, body mass index, BP, heart rate, and upper/lower muscle mass after exercise performance. However, toe pinch force was significantly increased (pre: 2.92 ± 1.19 kg, post: 3.65 ± 1.58 kg, p = 0.007). Toe muscle quality (toe pinch force/lower leg muscle mass) were also significantly increased (pre: 2.15 ± 0.86 kg/kg, post: 2.72 ± 1.26 kg/kg, p = 0.009).

Conclusions

Two weeks of toe resistance training significantly increased toe pinch force and toe muscle quality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Toe resistance training is might be essential for treating patients with diabetes mellitus in clinical practice.

Keywords

Type 2 diabetes mellitus Toe resistance training Toe pinch force Toe muscle quality 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was supported in part by research grants form 114 Bank, Japan.

Compliance with ethical standards

All authors declare no financial support or relationships that could pose a conflict of interest. All procedures followed were in accordance with the ethical standards of the responsible committee on human experimentation (institutional and national) and with the Helsinki Declaration of 1964 and later versions. Informed consent or substitute for it was obtained from all patients for being included in the study.

Conflict of interest

All authors declare no financial support or relationships that could pose a conflict of interest.

Human rights statement and informed consent

All procedures followed were in accordance with the ethical standards of the responsible committee on human experimentation (institutional and national) and with the Helsinki Declaration of 1964 and later versions. Informed consent or substitute for it was obtained from all patients for being included in the study.

Supplementary material

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Supplementary material 1 (PDF 1245 kb)
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Supplementary material 2 (PDF 1025 kb)
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Supplementary material 3 (PDF 348 kb)
13340_2017_318_MOESM4_ESM.pdf (133 kb)
Supplementary material 4 (PDF 132 kb)

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Copyright information

© The Japan Diabetes Society 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiroaki Kataoka
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nobuyuki Miyatake
    • 2
  • Naomi Kitayama
    • 1
  • Satoshi Murao
    • 3
  • Satoshi Tanaka
    • 4
  1. 1.Rehabilitation CenterKKR Takamatsu HospitalTakamatsu, KagawaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Hygiene, Faculty of MedicineKagawa UniversityKagawaJapan
  3. 3.Department of Diabetes and EndocrinologyKKR Takamatsu HospitalKagawaJapan
  4. 4.Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Health and WelfarePrefectural University of HiroshimaHiroshimaJapan

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