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Photonic Sensors

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 34–42 | Cite as

An HDR imaging method with DTDI technology for push-broom cameras

  • Wu Sun
  • Chengshan Han
  • Xucheng Xue
  • Hengyi Lv
  • Junxia Shi
  • Changhong Hu
  • Xiangzhi Li
  • Yao Fu
  • Xiaonan Jiang
  • Liang Huang
  • Hongyin Han
Open Access
Regular
  • 162 Downloads

Abstract

Conventionally, high dynamic-range (HDR) imaging is based on taking two or more pictures of the same scene with different exposure. However, due to a high-speed relative motion between the camera and the scene, it is hard for this technique to be applied to push-broom remote sensing cameras. For the sake of HDR imaging in push-broom remote sensing applications, the present paper proposes an innovative method which can generate HDR images without redundant image sensors or optical components. Specifically, this paper adopts an area array CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) with the digital domain time-delay-integration (DTDI) technology for imaging, instead of adopting more than one row of image sensors, thereby taking more than one picture with different exposure. And then a new HDR image by fusing two original images with a simple algorithm can be achieved. By conducting the experiment, the dynamic range (DR) of the image increases by 26.02 dB. The proposed method is proved to be effective and has potential in other imaging applications where there is a relative motion between the cameras and scenes.

Keywords

Push-broom cameras HDR imaging remote sensing 

Notes

Acknowledgment

The completion of this paper owns a great deal to the associate editor and anonymous reviewers for their valuable suggestions. The first author is grateful to Xiangzhi Fu for her language help, Guangxing Ding and Dongdong Zeng for their advice. All the authors of this paper express their gratitude to CIOMP for its experiment and site support. And all of us gratefully acknowledge the supports provided for this research by Jilin Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 201505200059JH).

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wu Sun
    • 1
    • 2
  • Chengshan Han
    • 1
  • Xucheng Xue
    • 1
  • Hengyi Lv
    • 1
    • 2
  • Junxia Shi
    • 1
  • Changhong Hu
    • 1
  • Xiangzhi Li
    • 1
  • Yao Fu
    • 1
  • Xiaonan Jiang
    • 1
  • Liang Huang
    • 1
  • Hongyin Han
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and PhysicsChinese Academy of SciencesChangchunChina
  2. 2.University of Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina

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