Cereal cultivars can be ranked consistently for resistance to root-lesion nematodes (Pratylenchus thornei & P. neglectus) using diverse procedures

Abstract

The root-lesion nematodes (RLN) Pratylenchus thornei and P. neglectus are widely distributed in Australian grain producing regions and can reduce the yield of intolerant wheat cultivars by up to 65 %, costing the industry ~123 M AUD/year. Consequently, researchers in the northern, southern and western regions have independently developed procedures to evaluate the resistance of cereal cultivars to RLN. To compare results, each of the three laboratories phenotyped a set of 26 and 36 cereal cultivars for relative resistance/susceptibility to P. thornei and P. neglectus respectively. The northern and southern regions also investigated the effects of planting time and experiment duration on RLN reproduction and cultivar ranking. Results show the genetic correlation between cultivars tested using the northern and southern procedures evaluating P. thornei resistance was 0.93. Genetic correlations between experiments using the same procedure, but with different planting times, were 0.99 for both northern and southern procedures. The genetic correlation between cultivars tested using the northern, southern and western procedures evaluating P. neglectus resistance ranged from 0.71 to 0.95. Genetic correlations between experiments using the same procedure but with different planting times ranged from 0.91 to 0.99. This study established that, even though experiments were conducted in different geographic locations and with different trial management practices, the diverse nematode resistance screening procedures ranked cultivars similarly. Consequently, RLN resistance data can be pooled across regions to provide national consensus ratings of cultivars.

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Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank Rohan Rainbow (Grains Research and Development Corporation) for initiating this research and the GRDC for funding. We also thank Roslyn Reen (DAFFQ), Danuta Pounsett and Irena Dadej (SARDI) and Helen Hunter, Lucy Debrincat and Sarah Collins (DAFWA) for technical assistance.

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Correspondence to J. G. Sheedy.

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Sheedy, J.G., McKay, A.C., Lewis, J. et al. Cereal cultivars can be ranked consistently for resistance to root-lesion nematodes (Pratylenchus thornei & P. neglectus) using diverse procedures. Australasian Plant Pathol. 44, 175–182 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13313-014-0333-4

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Keywords

  • Breeding
  • Methods
  • Pratylenchus neglectus
  • Pratylenchus thornei
  • Resistance
  • Root-lesion nematode
  • Wheat