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Variation within the genus Lambertia in efficacy of low-volume aerial phosphite spray for control of Phytophthora cinnamomi

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Abstract

Soil and stem wound inoculation was used to determine variation in phosphite efficacy for the control of Phytophthora cinnamomi within the genus Lambertia. Disease progress curves following soil inoculation with P. cinnamomi were analysed with the parameters of the logistic model. The asymptote and lag logistic model parameters of disease progress better differentiated between phosphite treatments than the rate parameter. Low-volume phosphite spray significantly reduced the asymptote Kmax of % mortality and significantly increased the delay t1/2K for all Lambertia taxa soil inoculated. Kmax was significantly negatively correlated with delay t1/2K and taxa sprayed with 48 kg phosphite/ha had a lower Kmax and longer delay t1/2K than taxa not sprayed. Phosphite significantly reduced colonisation by P. cinnamomi in stems of 19% of Lambertia taxa tested. The differences in phosphite efficacy between soil and wound inoculation suggests that phosphite may inhibit the infection process more than post-infection stem colonisation. The lack of direct relationships between control of P. cinnamomi and tissue phosphite concentrations may be related to different effective phosphite thresholds between taxa. Time-course studies of in-planta phosphite concentrations in relation to effective control of P. cinnamomi are required in different plant species and environments.

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Acknowledgements

We thank the Director of Department of Environment and Conservation Science Division and Bankwest Landscope Conservation Visa Card for funding, A Cochrane and M. Spencer for collecting seed, A. Lin for phosphite analysis and S. Barrett, C. Dunne, J. McComb and M. Shearer for checking the manuscript.

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Correspondence to B. L. Shearer.

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Shearer, B.L., Crane, C.E. Variation within the genus Lambertia in efficacy of low-volume aerial phosphite spray for control of Phytophthora cinnamomi . Australasian Plant Pathol. 41, 47–57 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13313-011-0088-0

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