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The re-imagining of a framework for agricultural land use: A pathway for integrating agricultural practices into ecosystem services, planetary boundaries and sustainable development goals

This article belongs to Ambio’s 50th Anniversary Collection. Theme: Agricultural land use

Abstract

This paper reflects on the legacy of the Ambio papers by Sombroek et al. (1993), Turner et al. (1994), and Brussaard et al. (1997) on the study of agricultural land use and its impacts on global carbon storage and nutrient dynamics. The papers were published at a time of transition in ecology that involved the integration of humans as components of ecosystems, the formulation of the ecosystem services, and emergence of sustainability science. The papers offered new frameworks to studying agricultural land use across multiple scales in a way that captured causality from interacting components of the system. Each paper argued for more comprehensive data sets; foreseeing the power of network-based science, the potential of molecular technologies to assess biodiversity, and advances in remote sensing. The papers have contributed both conceptual framings and methodological approaches to an ongoing movement to identify a pathway to study agricultural land use and environmental change that fit within the concepts of ecosystem services, planetary boundaries and sustainable development goals.

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Correspondence to John C. Moore.

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Moore, J.C. The re-imagining of a framework for agricultural land use: A pathway for integrating agricultural practices into ecosystem services, planetary boundaries and sustainable development goals. Ambio 50, 1295–1298 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13280-020-01483-w

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Keywords

  • Agricultural land use
  • Carbon cycle
  • Soil ecology
  • Sustainable development