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Plant–pollinator interactions in urban ecosystems worldwide: A comprehensive review including research funding and policy actions

Abstract

Urbanization has rapidly increased in recent decades and the negative effects on biodiversity have been widely reported. Urban green areas can contribute to improving human well-being, maintaining biodiversity, and ecosystem services (e.g. pollination). Here we examine the evolution of studies on plant–pollinator interactions in urban ecosystems worldwide, reviewing also research funding and policy actions. We documented a significant increase in the scientific production on the theme in recent years, especially in the temperate region; tropical urban ecosystems are still neglected. Plant–pollinator interactions are threatened by urbanization in complex ways, depending on the studied group (plant or pollinator [generalist or specialist]) and landscape characteristics. Several research opportunities emerge from our review. Research funding and policy actions to pollination/pollinator in urban ecosystems are still scarce and concentrated in developed countries/temperate regions. To make urban green spaces contribute to the maintenance of biodiversity and the provision of ecosystem services, transdisciplinary approaches (ecological–social–economic–cultural) are needed.

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source: The United Nations 2019)

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source: Dimensions Platform 2020; https://www.dimensions.ai/)

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Acknowledgements

We would like to thank Fundação de Amparo à Ciência e Tecnologia do Estado de Pernambuco-FACEPE, which funded this study via grants to JLSS (Grant No. IBPG-0774-2.03/13), MTPO (grant number IBPG-0420-2.03/14) and OCN (Grant No. APQ-0789-2.05/16 and BCT-0208-2.05/17). The study was also funded by Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico-CNPq (Grants: 481755/2013-6 and 309505/2018­6 to AVL) and Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior-CAPES (Grant 001 to MTPO, JLSS, OCN, MT and AVL). Data on Research funding/Grants and Policy documents were kindly provided by Digital Science’s Dimensions Platform (2020), an inter-linked research information system (https://app.dimensions.ai).

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JLSS, MTPO, and OCN have contributed equally to this work. AVL, JLSS and OCN conceived the ideas; JLSS, MTPO and OCN contributed to data collection; JLSS, MTPO and OCN analyzed the data; JLSS and OCN wrote first draft; JLSS, OCN, MT and AVL contributed to writing, review and editing; all author contributed to funding acquisition.

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Correspondence to Ariadna Valentina Lopes.

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Silva, J.L.S., de Oliveira, M.T.P., Cruz-Neto, O. et al. Plant–pollinator interactions in urban ecosystems worldwide: A comprehensive review including research funding and policy actions. Ambio 50, 884–900 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13280-020-01410-z

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Keywords

  • Ecosystem service
  • Pollination
  • Scientometrics
  • Urban ecology
  • Urban green areas
  • Urbanization