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Tumor Biology

, Volume 37, Issue 8, pp 11219–11224 | Cite as

Armc8 regulates the invasive ability of hepatocellular carcinoma through E-cadherin/catenin complex

  • Yang Zhao
  • Songlin Peng
  • Changjun Jia
  • Feng Xu
  • Yongqing Xu
  • Chaoliu Dai
Original Article

Abstract

Armc8 (armadillo-repeat-containing protein 8) was proved to promote disruption of E-cadherin complex through regulating α-catenin degradation. In this study, we investigated Armc8 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma using immunohistochemistry (IHC). The positive rate of Armc8 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma was 53.9 % and higher than that in normal hepatic tissues (9.2 %) (p < 0.05). Clinicopathological analysis shows that Armc8 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma was significantly associated with larger tumor size (≥5 cm), multiple tumor numbers, higher pathological grade (media and poor), advanced TNM stages (II/III), and advanced BCLC stages (B/C). Western blot study also detected higher Armc8 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells including HepG2, HCC97L, and SMMC-7721 than in human hepatic cell Bel-7402. We further use specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to knock down Armc8 expression in HepG2 cells and found that knockdown of Armc8 expression significantly inhibited the invasive ability of HepG2 cells. Downregulation of Armc8 expression significantly upregulated α-catenin, β-catenin, and E-cadherin expression in HepG2 cells. Immunofluorescent study shows that knockdown of Armc8 expression restored E-cadherin expression in membrane of HepG2 cells. These results indicate that Armc8 may be a potential cancer marker in hepatocellular carcinoma and may regulate cancer invasion through E-cadherin/catenin complex.

Keywords

Armc8 α-catenin β-catenin E-cadherin Hepatocellular carcinoma 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

This study was conducted under the regulations of the Institutional Review Board of the Affiliated Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University. Informed consent was obtained from all patients.

Conflicts of interest

None

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Copyright information

© International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers (ISOBM) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yang Zhao
    • 1
  • Songlin Peng
    • 1
  • Changjun Jia
    • 1
  • Feng Xu
    • 1
  • Yongqing Xu
    • 1
  • Chaoliu Dai
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Hepatobiliary and Spleenary SurgeryThe Affiliated Shengjing Hospital, China Medical UniversityShenyangChina

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