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Tumor Biology

, Volume 37, Issue 5, pp 5705–5714 | Cite as

Profiling cell-free and circulating miRNA: a clinical diagnostic tool for different cancers

Review

Abstract

Effective cancer management depends on early diagnosis and treatment. There are several microRNAs (miRNAs) which are used for detection of various cancers. Cell-free and circulating miRNAs originate from plasma, either from blood cells or endothelial cells. Cell-free and circulating miRNAs are very much important in the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer therapy. Admittedly, biological knowledge of extracellular miRNAs is still at its preliminary level. Recent discoveries of novel cell-free and circulating miRNAs from the body fluids are now being considered as important biomarkers that may help us in the early diagnosis of any cancer. In the present review, we highlight the biogenesis of miRNAs and their current extracellular pattern, the discovery of circulating miRNA, significant advantages, and different profiling techniques. Finally, we discuss the different circulating miRNAs such as miR-21, miR-20a, miR-155, miR‑221, miR-210, miR-218, miR-200-family, miR-141, miR-122, miR-486-5p, miR‑423-5p, miR-29a, and miR-500 for clinical diagnosis of various cancers. The present review may be beneficial for future researches concerned with miRNAs which are used for detection of various cancers.

Keywords

Biomarkers Cancer Diagnosis miRNA 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflicts of interest

None.

Source of funding

UKM DLP grant-2014-009.

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Copyright information

© International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers (ISOBM) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Bioinformatics, School of Computer and Information SciencesGalgotias UniversityUttar PradeshIndia
  2. 2.Department of Anatomy, Faculty of MedicineUniversiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical CentreKuala LumpurMalaysia

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