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Tumor Biology

, Volume 37, Issue 7, pp 8909–8916 | Cite as

Vitronectin: a promising breast cancer serum biomarker for early diagnosis of breast cancer in patients

  • Wende Hao
  • Xuhui Zhang
  • Bingshui Xiu
  • Xiqin Yang
  • Shuofeng Hu
  • Zhiqiang Liu
  • Cuimi Duan
  • Shujuan Jin
  • Xiaomin Ying
  • Yanfeng Zhao
  • Xiaowei Han
  • Xiaopeng Hao
  • Yawen Fan
  • Heather Johnson
  • Di Meng
  • Jenny L. Persson
  • Heqiu Zhang
  • XiaoYan Feng
  • Yan Huang
Original Article

Abstract

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide, identification of new biomarkers for early diagnosis and detection will improve the clinical outcome of breast cancer patients. In the present study, we determined serum levels of vitronectin (VN) in 93 breast cancer patients, 30 benign breast lesions, 9 precancerous lesions, and 30 healthy individuals by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Serum VN level was significantly higher in patients with stage 0–I primary breast cancer than in healthy individuals, patients with benign breast lesion or precancerous lesions, as well as those with breast cancer of higher stages. Serum VN level was significantly and negatively correlated with tumor size, lymph node status, and clinical stage (p < 0.05 in all cases). In addition, VN displayed higher area under curve (AUC) value (0.73, 95 % confidence interval (CI) [0.62–0.84]) than carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (0.64, 95 % CI [0.52–0.77]) and cancer antigen 15-3 (CA 15-3) (0.69, 95 % CI [0.58–0.81]) when used to distinguish stage 0–I cancer and normal control. Importantly, the combined use of three biomarkers yielded an improvement in receiver operating characteristic curve with an AUC of 0.83, 95 % CI [0.74–0.92]. Taken together, our current study showed for the first time that serum VN is a promising biomarker for early diagnosis of breast cancer when combined with CEA and CA15-3.

Keywords

Breast cancer Early stage Serum Diagnosis 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are grateful to the patients for allowing the use of their sera for this research project. This work was supported by the National High-tech Research and Development Program (2011AA02A120, 2011–2015).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflicts of interests

None

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Copyright information

© International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers (ISOBM) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wende Hao
    • 1
  • Xuhui Zhang
    • 2
  • Bingshui Xiu
    • 2
  • Xiqin Yang
    • 2
  • Shuofeng Hu
    • 2
  • Zhiqiang Liu
    • 2
  • Cuimi Duan
    • 2
  • Shujuan Jin
    • 1
  • Xiaomin Ying
    • 2
  • Yanfeng Zhao
    • 2
  • Xiaowei Han
    • 1
  • Xiaopeng Hao
    • 1
  • Yawen Fan
    • 2
  • Heather Johnson
    • 3
  • Di Meng
    • 1
  • Jenny L. Persson
    • 4
  • Heqiu Zhang
    • 2
  • XiaoYan Feng
    • 2
  • Yan Huang
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Breast SurgeryAffiliated 307 HospitalBeijingChina
  2. 2.Department of Bio-diagnosisInstitute of Basic Medical SciencesBeijingChina
  3. 3.Olympia Diagnostics, Inc.SunnyvaleUSA
  4. 4.Division of Experimental Cancer Research, Department of Laboratory Medicine in Malmö, Clinical Research CenterLund UniversityMalmöSweden

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