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Tumor Biology

, Volume 37, Issue 5, pp 6653–6659 | Cite as

Influence of a single-nucleotide polymorphism of the DNA mismatch repair-related gene exonuclease-1 (rs9350) with prostate cancer risk among Chinese people

  • Yiming Zhang
  • Pengju Li
  • Abai Xu
  • Jie Chen
  • Chao Ma
  • Akiko Sakai
  • Liping Xie
  • Lei Wang
  • Yanqun Na
  • Haruki Kaku
  • Peng Xu
  • Zhong Jin
  • Xiezhao Li
  • Kai Guo
  • Haiyan Shen
  • Shaobo Zheng
  • Hiromi Kumon
  • Chunxiao Liu
  • Peng Huang
Original Article
  • 190 Downloads

Abstract

In this study, we aimed to identify the influence of exonuclease 1 (EXO1) single-nucleotide polymorphism rs9350, which is involved in DNA mismatch repair, on prostate cancer risk in Chinese people. In our hospital-based case–control study, 214 prostate cancer patients and 253 cancer-free control subjects were enrolled from three hospitals in China. Genotyping for rs9350 was performed by the SNaPshot® method using peripheral blood samples. Consequently, a significantly higher prostate cancer risk was observed in patients with the CC genotype [odds ratio (OR) = 1.678, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.130–2.494, P = 0.010] than in those with the CT genotype. Further, the CT/TT genotypes were significantly associated with increased prostate cancer risk (adjusted OR = 1.714, 95 % CI = 1.176–2.500, P = 0.005), and the C allele had a statistically significant compared with T allele (P = 0.009) of EXO1 (rs9350). Through stratified analysis, significant associations were revealed for the CT/TT genotype in the subgroup with diagnosis age >72 (adjusted OR = 1.776, 95 % CI = 1.051–3.002, P = 0.032) and in patients with localized disease subgroup (adjusted OR = 1.798, 95 % CI = 1.070–3.022, P = 0.027). In addition, we observed that patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels of ≤10 ng/mL were more likely to have the CT/TT genotypes than those with PSA levels of >10 ng/mL (P = 0.006). For the first time, we present evidence that the inherited EXO1 polymorphism rs9350 may have a substantial influence on prostate cancer risk in Chinese people. We believe that the rs9350 could be a useful biomarker for assessing predisposition for and early diagnosis of prostate cancer.

Keywords

Prostate cancer Single-nucleotide polymorphisms EXO1 rs9350 DNA mismatch repair 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by scientific research grants from the Pearl River Nova Program of Guangzhou (No. 2013J2200044); the National Natural Scientific Foundation of China (No. 81101559); and the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan (Nos. KAKENHI 25861425 and 15K20093).

Compliance with ethical standards

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Conflicts of interest

None

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Copyright information

© International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers (ISOBM) 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yiming Zhang
    • 1
  • Pengju Li
    • 1
  • Abai Xu
    • 1
  • Jie Chen
    • 2
    • 3
  • Chao Ma
    • 4
  • Akiko Sakai
    • 5
  • Liping Xie
    • 6
  • Lei Wang
    • 7
  • Yanqun Na
    • 7
  • Haruki Kaku
    • 8
  • Peng Xu
    • 1
  • Zhong Jin
    • 1
  • Xiezhao Li
    • 1
  • Kai Guo
    • 1
  • Haiyan Shen
    • 1
  • Shaobo Zheng
    • 1
  • Hiromi Kumon
    • 2
    • 3
  • Chunxiao Liu
    • 1
  • Peng Huang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 9
  1. 1.Department of Urology, Zhujiang HospitalSouthern Medical UniversityHaizhu DistrictChina
  2. 2.Department of UrologyOkayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical SciencesOkayamaJapan
  3. 3.Center for Innovative Clinical MedicineOkayama University HospitalOkayamaJapan
  4. 4.Department of UrologyThe First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou UniversityZhengzhouChina
  5. 5.Department of Molecular GeneticsOkayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical SciencesOkayamaJapan
  6. 6.Department of UrologyThe First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang UniversityHangzhouChina
  7. 7.Peking University Wu-jieping Urology CenterPeking University Shougang HospitalPekingChina
  8. 8.Department of UrologyOkamura Isshindow HospitalOkayamaJapan
  9. 9.Okayama Medical Innovation CenterOkayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical SciencesOkayamaJapan

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