Tumor Biology

, Volume 36, Issue 11, pp 8685–8695 | Cite as

Expression of cancer-associated fibroblast-related proteins in adipose stroma of breast cancer

Research Article

Abstract

Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play key roles in tumor microenvironment; they are thought to originate from adipocytes. This study aimed to evaluate CAF-related protein expression and its implications in breast cancer. Of the 939 enrolled breast cancer patients, 642 had fibrous and 297 had adipose stroma. The status of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2), Ki-67, podoplanin, prolyl 4-hydroxylase, fibroblast activation protein α (FAPα), S100A4, platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα), PDGFRβ, and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (NG2) was evaluated via tissue microarrays. Tumors were divided into luminal A, luminal B, HER-2, or triple-negative breast cancer subtypes according to their molecular status. Luminal A subtype was more prevalent in breast cancer of adipose stroma type, whereas other molecular subtypes were more common in fibrous stroma type (p < 0.001). Tumor cell expression of podoplanin and FAPα was higher in adipose stroma type, while higher expression of prolyl 4-hydroxylase and PDGFRα was observed in fibrous stroma type. Furthermore, adipose stroma type exhibited higher stromal expression of podoplanin, FAPα, PDGFRβ, and NG2, whereas fibrous stroma type had higher prolyl 4-hydroxylase and S100A4 expression. In adipose stroma type, tumor positivity (p = 0.034) and stromal positivity (p = 0.005) of prolyl 4-hydroxylase were associated with shorter disease-free survival, and stromal prolyl 4-hydroxylase positivity was with shorter overall survival (p < 0.001). In conclusion, expression of CAF-related proteins was observed in breast cancer, with different profiles between adipose and fibrous stroma types. Prolyl 4-hydrolase status might be of prognostic value in adipose stroma type.

Keywords

Adipocyte Breast cancer Cancer-associated fibroblast Tumor stroma 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by a grant from the National R&D Program for Cancer Control, Ministry of Health & Welfare, Republic of Korea (1420080). This research was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT, and Future Planning (2015R1A1A1A05001209).

Conflicts of interest

None

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Copyright information

© International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers (ISOBM) 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PathologyYonsei University College of Medicine, Severance HospitalSeoulSouth Korea

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