Tumor Biology

, Volume 36, Issue 8, pp 5979–5985 | Cite as

C6orf106 enhances NSCLC cell invasion by upregulating vimentin, and downregulating E-cadherin and P120ctn

  • Xiupeng Zhang
  • Yuan Miao
  • Xinmiao Yu
  • Yong Zhang
  • Guiyang Jiang
  • Yang Liu
  • Juanhan Yu
  • Qiang Han
  • Huanyu Zhao
  • Enhua Wang
Research Article

Abstract

Chromosome 6 open reading frame 106 (C6orf106) is a newly discovered protein; its expression and clinical pathological significance in human tumors remains unclear. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and immunofluorescence were performed to assess C6orf106 expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In addition, the relationships between subcellular localization and clinical pathological factors were analyzed. Through C6orf106 overexpression and repression, respectively, in lung cancer cell lines, we explored the effect of this molecule on NSCLC invasion abilities. C6orf106 was highly expressed in the cytoplasm of lung cancer tissue cells (60.4 %, 75/124), compared with adjacent normal lung tissues (15.2 %, 7/46, p < 0.001). In addition, its expression was positively correlated with differentiation (p = 0.001), TNM stage (p = 0.011), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.018), and poor prognosis (p = 0.006). Furthermore, C6orf106 overexpression enhanced NSCLC cell invasion. Moreover, C6orf106 was shown to increase vimentin expression, while decreasing E-cadherin and P120ctn. C6orf106 is highly expressed in NSCLC and correlates with clinical and pathological factors, as well as poor prognosis. C6orf106 promotes invasion in NSCLC cells. Finally, C6orf106 upregulates vimentin, and downregulates E-cadherin and P120ctn.

Keywords

C6orf106 Vimentin E-cadherin P120ctn NSCLC Invasion 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are grateful to Dr. Hiroshi Kijima (Department of Pathology and Bioscience, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan) for providing the cell lines mentioned in this manuscript. This work was supported by grants from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (no. 81272606 to Enhua Wang, no. 81302312 to Yang Liu, no. 81472805 to Yuan Miao, no. 81402369 to Guiyang Jiang, and no. 81301837 to Juanhan Yu).

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Copyright information

© International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers (ISOBM) 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiupeng Zhang
    • 1
  • Yuan Miao
    • 1
  • Xinmiao Yu
    • 2
  • Yong Zhang
    • 1
  • Guiyang Jiang
    • 1
  • Yang Liu
    • 1
  • Juanhan Yu
    • 1
  • Qiang Han
    • 1
  • Huanyu Zhao
    • 1
  • Enhua Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pathology, First Affiliated Hospital and College of Basic Medical SciencesChina Medical UniversityShenyangChina
  2. 2.Department of Surgical Oncology and Breast Surgery, First Affiliated HospitalChina Medical UniversityShenyangChina

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