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Tumor Biology

, Volume 36, Issue 5, pp 3573–3582 | Cite as

Oxidized low-density lipoprotein is associated with advanced-stage prostate cancer

  • Fangning Wan
  • Xiaojian Qin
  • Guiming Zhang
  • Xiaolin Lu
  • Yao Zhu
  • Hailiang Zhang
  • Bo Dai
  • Guohai Shi
  • Dingwei Ye
Research Article

Abstract

Clinical and epidemiological data suggest coronary artery disease shares etiology with prostate cancer (PCa). The aim of this work was to assess the effects of several serum markers reported in cardiovascular disease on PCa. Serum markers (oxidized low-density lipoprotein [ox-LDL], apolipoprotein [apo] B100, and apoB48) in peripheral blood samples from 50 patients from Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center (FUSCC) with localized or lymph node metastatic PCa were investigated in this study. Twenty-five samples from normal individuals were set as controls. We first conducted enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis to select candidate markers that were significantly different between these patients and controls. Then, the clinical relevance between OLR1 (the ox-LDL receptor) expression and PCa was analyzed in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) cohort. We also investigated the function of ox-LDL in PCa cell lines in vitro. Phosphorylation protein chips were used to analyze cell signaling pathways in ox-LDL-treated PC-3 cells. The ox-LDL level was found to be significantly correlated with N stage of prostate cancer. OLR1 expression was correlated with lymph node metastasis in the TCGA cohort. In vitro, ox-LDL stimulated the proliferation, migration, and invasion of LNCaP and PC-3 in a dose-dependent manner. The results of phosphoprotein microarray illustrated that ox-LDL could influence multiple signaling pathways of PC-3. Activation of proliferation promoting signaling pathways (including β-catenin, cMyc, NF-κB, STAT1, STAT3) as well as apoptosis-associating signaling pathways (including p27, caspase-3) demonstrated that ox-LDL had complicated effects on prostate cancer. Increased serum ox-LDL level and OLR1 expression may indicate advanced-stage PCa and lymph node metastasis. Moreover, ox-LDL could stimulate PCa proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro.

Keywords

Ox-LDL OLR1 Cell migration Prostate cancer Proliferation 

Supplementary material

13277_2014_2994_MOESM1_ESM.xlsx (21 kb)
Supplementary Table 1 (XLSX 21 kb)

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Copyright information

© International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers (ISOBM) 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fangning Wan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiaojian Qin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Guiming Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiaolin Lu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yao Zhu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hailiang Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bo Dai
    • 1
    • 2
  • Guohai Shi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Dingwei Ye
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of UrologyFudan University Shanghai Cancer CenterShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical CollegeFudan UniversityShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China

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