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Tumor Biology

, Volume 36, Issue 4, pp 2601–2605 | Cite as

Clinical significance of SPRR1A expression in progesterone receptor-positive breast cancer

  • Guanglei Chen
  • Gang Li
  • Minna Luo
  • Xiaofei Wei
  • Dan Wang
  • Hao Zhang
  • Xinhan Zhao
  • Bo Chen
  • Caigang Liu
Research Article
  • 167 Downloads

Abstract

Small proline-rich repeat protein 1A (SPRR1A) is a marker for terminal squamous cell differentiation. Previous studies showed that SPRR1A expression increases in squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, but decreases in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. This study focuses on the expression of SPRR1A protein in breast cancers (BCs) in China. A total of 111 patients with histologically confirmed BC, who underwent radical surgery between January 2006 and September 2007 in China Medical University, were enrolled. The relationship between SPRR1A expression and clinicopathological factors as well as BC prognoses was also determined. Overall, SPRR1A expression was detected in more than half of the BC specimens by immunohistochemistry (56/111, 53.8 %), but there was no significant difference between age groups (≥50 vs. <50 years) in terms of SPRR1A expression (P = 0.915), as well as no differences between SPRR1A expression and the clinical stage (0–I vs. II–III) or nodal status (P = 0.234 and 0.632, respectively). Moreover, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 overexpression was not correlated with SPRR1A expression, whereas Ki67 was associated with SPRR1A expression (P = 0.155 and 0.028, respectively). Interestingly, SPRR1A expression was significantly associated with progesterone receptor-positive (P = 0.010) rather than estrogen receptor-positive (0.778) BCs. The 5-year survival rate in patients did not differ with the presence or absence of SPRR1A expression (P = 0.753), whereas the combination of SPRR1A expression, progesterone receptor status, and menopausal status allowed identification of a subgroup of BC patients with a good long-term prognosis. Thus, the SPRR1A status might play an important role in the prognosis of postmenopausal breast carcinoma patients, especially that of progesterone receptor-positive subgroups.

Keywords

Breast cancer SPRR1A Progesterone receptor positive 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was funded by the grants from the China National Natural Science Foundation (Nos. 81102029, 81172047, and 81372811) and Liaoning National Natural Science Foundation (No. 2013021006).

Conflicts of interest

None

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Copyright information

© International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers (ISOBM) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guanglei Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gang Li
    • 3
  • Minna Luo
    • 4
  • Xiaofei Wei
    • 1
  • Dan Wang
    • 1
  • Hao Zhang
    • 1
  • Xinhan Zhao
    • 4
  • Bo Chen
    • 2
  • Caigang Liu
    • 1
  1. 1.Breast Disease and Reconstruction Center, Breast Cancer Key Lab of DalianThe Second Hospital of Dalian Medical UniversityDalianChina
  2. 2.Breast SurgeryThe First Hospital of China Medical UniversityShenyangChina
  3. 3.Department of UrologyTianjin Institute of Urology, The Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical UniversityTianjinChina
  4. 4.Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of MedicineXi’an Jiaotong UniversityXi’anChina

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