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Tumor Biology

, Volume 36, Issue 3, pp 1567–1572 | Cite as

Impact of serum vitamin D level on risk of bladder cancer: a systemic review and meta-analysis

  • Yong Liao
  • Jian-Lin Huang
  • Ming-Xing Qiu
  • Zhi-Wei Ma
Research Article

Abstract

Vitamin D has important biological functions including modulation of the immune system and anti-cancer effects. There was no conclusive finding of the impact of serum vitamin D level on bladder cancer risk. A systemic review and meta-analysis was performed to assess the impact of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level on bladder cancer risk. The pooled relative risk (RR) with 95 % confidence interval (95%CI) was used to assess the impact of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level on bladder cancer risk. A total of 89,610 participants and 2238 bladder cancer cases were finally included into the meta-analysis. There was no obvious heterogeneity among those included studies (I 2 = 0 %). Meta-analysis total included studies which showed that a high serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level could obviously decrease risk of bladder cancer (RR = 0.75, 95%CI 0.65–0.87, P < 0.001). In addition, the pooled RRs were not significantly changed by excluding any single study. The findings from the meta-analysis suggest an obvious protective effect of vitamin D against bladder cancer. Individuals with higher serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels suffer from less risk of subsequent bladder cancer.

Keywords

Bladder cancer Vitamin D Risk Meta-analysis 

Notes

Conflicts of interest

None

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Copyright information

© International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers (ISOBM) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yong Liao
    • 1
  • Jian-Lin Huang
    • 1
  • Ming-Xing Qiu
    • 1
  • Zhi-Wei Ma
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of UrologySichuan Academy of Medical Sciences & Sichuan Provincial People’s HospitalChengduChina

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