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Tumor Biology

, Volume 36, Issue 2, pp 1023–1027 | Cite as

Alcohol dehydrogenase-1B Arg47His polymorphism is associated with head and neck cancer risk in Asian: a meta-analysis

  • Yu Zhang
  • Ning Gu
  • Limin Miao
  • Hua Yuan
  • Ruixia Wang
  • Hongbing Jiang
Research Article

Abstract

Head and neck cancers (HNCs) include cancers which arise in oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx. Recent studies have demonstrated that alcohol drinking is an established risk factor for HNC. The alcohol dehydrogenase-1B (ADH1B) plays a major role in the oxidized process of alcohol. To investigate the association of ADH1B Arg47His with HNC in Asian populations, we combined all available studies into a meta-analysis. A total of 2186 cases and 4488 controls were analyzed for this meta-analysis. We used odds ratios (ORs) to assess the strength of the association and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) to give a sense of the precision of the estimate. The ADH1B*47Arg allele was found to be associated with increased risk of HNC in Asians, with the pooled odds ratios (ORs) (Arg/Arg vs. Arg/His + His/His: OR = 2.35, 95 % CI = 1.56–3.55, P < 0.0001) in all eight studies. In the subgroup analysis by alcohol consumption, the Arg/Arg vs. Arg/His + His/His genotype was found to be interacted with alcohol consumption, with the OR = 2.44, 95 % CI = 1.85–3.20 among ever drinkers. Besides, no significant association was found in non-drinkers. This meta-analysis revealed that ADH1B Arg47His (rs1229984) polymorphism could increase the risk of HNC in Asians significantly.

Keywords

Head and neck cancer Alcohol dehydrogenase-1B Polymorphism Genetic susceptibility 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was partly supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (81302361), Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (20133234120013), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2013 M540457), Jiangsu Planned Projects for Postdoctoral Research Funds (1301018A), and Priority Academic Program for the Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD, 2014-37).

Conflicts of interest

None

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Copyright information

© International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers (ISOBM) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yu Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ning Gu
    • 1
  • Limin Miao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hua Yuan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ruixia Wang
    • 1
  • Hongbing Jiang
    • 1
  1. 1.Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Oral DiseasesNanjing Medical UniversityNanjingChina
  2. 2.Section of Clinical Epidemiology, Jiangsu Key Lab of Cancer Biomarkers, Prevention and Treatment, Cancer CentreNanjing Medical UniversityNanjingChina

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