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Tumor Biology

, Volume 36, Issue 2, pp 615–621 | Cite as

Rrp1B gene polymorphism (1307T>C) in metastatic progression of breast cancer

  • Santhoshi Rani Nanchari
  • Anuradha Cingeetham
  • Phannibhushann Meka
  • Surekha Damineni
  • Nageshwarao Tipirisetti
  • Chiranjeevi Padala
  • Sandhya Annamaneni
  • Surekha rani Hanumanth
  • Raghunadha Rao Digumarthi
  • Vishnupriya Satti
Research Article

Abstract

Rrp1B (ribosomal RNA processing1 homolog B) is a novel candidate metastasis modifier gene in breast cancer. Functional gene assays demonstrated that a physical and functional interaction existing between Rrp1b and metastasis modifier gene SIPA1 causes reduction in the tumor growth and metastatic potential. Ectopic expression of Rrp1B modulates various metastasis predictive extra cellular matrix (ECM) genes associated with tumor suppression. The aim of this study is to determine the functional significance of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in human Rrp1B gene (1307 T>C; rs9306160) with breast cancer development and progression. The study consists of 493 breast cancer cases recruited from Nizam’s Institute of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad, and 558 age-matched healthy female controls from rural and urban areas. Genomic DNA was isolated by non-enzymatic method. Genotyping was done by amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS-PCR) method. Genotypes were reconfirmed by sequencing and results were analyzed statistically. We have performed Insilco analysis to know the RNA secondary structure by using online tool m fold. The TT genotype and T allele frequencies of Rrp1B1307 T>C polymorphism were significantly elevated in breast cancer (χ 2; p = <0.008) cases compared to controls under different genetic models. The presence of T allele had conferred 1.75-fold risk for breast cancer development (OR = 1.75; 95 % CI = 1.15–2.67). The frequency of TT genotype of Rrp1b 1307T>C polymorphism was significantly elevated in obese patients (χ 2; p = 0.008) and patients with advanced disease (χ 2; p = 0.01) and with increased tumor size (χ 2; p = 0.01). Moreover, elevated frequency of T allele was also associated with positive lymph node status (χ 2; p = 0.04) and Her2 negative receptor status (χ 2; p = 0.006). Presence of Rrp1b1307TT genotype and T allele confer strong risk for breast cancer development and progression.

Keywords

Metastasis ECM genes Rrp1B gene Single nucleotide polymorphisms Association 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank all the breast cancer patients and healthy volunteers for participating in the study, as well as all the people who helped us to complete this work.

Conflicts of interest

None

Funding

This study was funded by DBT-OU-ISLARE and Centre for advanced studies (CAS), Department of Genetics, O. U. SRN is thankful to UGC-RFSMS for providing fellowship.

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Copyright information

© International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers (ISOBM) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Santhoshi Rani Nanchari
    • 1
  • Anuradha Cingeetham
    • 1
  • Phannibhushann Meka
    • 1
  • Surekha Damineni
    • 2
  • Nageshwarao Tipirisetti
    • 1
  • Chiranjeevi Padala
    • 1
  • Sandhya Annamaneni
    • 1
  • Surekha rani Hanumanth
    • 1
  • Raghunadha Rao Digumarthi
    • 3
  • Vishnupriya Satti
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GeneticsOsmania UniversityHyderabadIndia
  2. 2.Indian Institute of ScienceBangaloreIndia
  3. 3.Nizam’s Institute of Medical SciencesHyderabadIndia

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