Tumor Biology

, Volume 35, Issue 10, pp 9497–9503 | Cite as

The lncRNA-MYC regulatory network in cancer

  • Kaiyuan Deng
  • Xiaoqiang Guo
  • Hao Wang
  • Jiazeng Xia
Review

Abstract

Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been widely studied in recent years, and accumulating evidence identified lncRNAs as crucial regulators of various biological processes, including cell cycle progression, chromatin remodeling, gene transcription, and posttranscriptional processing. In addition, the fact that lncRNAs interact with the MYC gene family in human carcinomas has been discovered. This review summarizes the latest progress on the investigation of lncRNAs and MYC, particularly focusing on the interplay between lncRNAs and MYC in cancer to reveal the significance of lncRNA-MYC network in regulating initiation, development, and metastasis of tumors. Further research and collection of clinical data would provide a better understanding of lncRNA-MYC network in cancer diagnosis and treatment.

Keywords

LncRNA MYC c-Myc Cancer 

Notes

Conflicts of interest

None

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Copyright information

© International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers (ISOBM) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kaiyuan Deng
    • 1
  • Xiaoqiang Guo
    • 1
  • Hao Wang
    • 1
  • Jiazeng Xia
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of General Surgery and Translational Medicine CenterNanjing Medical University Affiliated Wuxi Second HospitalWuxiChina

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