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Tumor Biology

, Volume 35, Issue 10, pp 9701–9706 | Cite as

lncRNA-AC130710 targeting by miR-129-5p is upregulated in gastric cancer and associates with poor prognosis

  • Chunjing Xu
  • Yongfu Shao
  • Tian Xia
  • Yunben Yang
  • Jiawei Dai
  • Lin Luo
  • Xinjun Zhang
  • Weiliang Sun
  • Haojun Song
  • Bingxiu Xiao
  • Junming Guo
Research Article

Abstract

Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play an important role in cancer occurrence and development. However, there is largely unknown about lncRNAs significance in the diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer. In our study, we focused on AC130710, one of lncRNAs. Gastric cancer tissues and adjacent tissues were gathered from 78 patients with gastric cancer. The AC130710 levels were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Then, we further analyzed the association between AC130710 level and the clinicopathological factors of patients with gastric cancer. Finally, the molecular mechanism underling AC130710 highly expressed in gastric cancer cells was explored. The results showed that AC130710 in cancer tissues from patients with gastric cancer was significantly higher than those in adjacent noncancerous tissues (P < 0.05). Its expression level was significantly associated with tumor size (P = 0.013), tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stages (P = 0.030), and distal metastasis (P = 0.018). AC130710 expression in MGC-803 was significantly higher than that in normal gastric mucosa cell line GES-1 (P < 0.001). Moreover, miR-129-5p may play an important role in the downregulation of AC130710 in gastric cancer cells. These results indicated that lncRNA-AC130710 may be a potential tumor marker for gastric cancer prognosis.

Keywords

Long noncoding RNA AC130710 Gastric cancer Tumor marker 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 81171660), the Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (No. LY14C060003), the Applied Research Project on Nonprofit Technology of Zhejiang Province (Nos. 2012C23127 and 2014C33222), the Scientific Innovation Team Project of Ningbo (No. 2011B82014), the Project of Outstanding Youth Health Technical Personnel of Ningbo, the Postgraduate Scientific Innovation Foundation of Ningbo University (No. G14069), and the K. C. Wong Magna Fund in Ningbo University.

Conflicts of interest

None

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Copyright information

© International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers (ISOBM) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chunjing Xu
    • 1
  • Yongfu Shao
    • 1
  • Tian Xia
    • 1
  • Yunben Yang
    • 1
  • Jiawei Dai
    • 1
  • Lin Luo
    • 1
  • Xinjun Zhang
    • 2
  • Weiliang Sun
    • 4
  • Haojun Song
    • 3
  • Bingxiu Xiao
    • 1
  • Junming Guo
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of PathophysiologyNingbo University School of MedicineNingboChina
  2. 2.Department of GastroenterologyThe Affiliated Hospital of Ningbo University School of MedicineNingboChina
  3. 3.Department of GastroenterologyNingbo No. 1 Hospital and the Affiliated Hospital of Ningbo University School of MedicineNingboChina
  4. 4.Ningbo Yinzhou People’s Hospital and the Affiliated HospitalNingbo University School of MedicineNingboChina

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