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Tumor Biology

, Volume 35, Issue 5, pp 3961–3973 | Cite as

Low circulating adiponectin levels in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: an updated meta-analysis

Review

Abstract

Adiponectin, as an important adipocytokine, plays a pivotal role in the regulation of insulin sensitivity and metabolism. It has been reported that circulating adiponectin levels were decreased in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, the results remained inconsistent. In order to derive a more precise estimation of this relationship, a large meta-analysis was performed in this study. A comprehensive systematic electronic search was conducted in electronic databases PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science up to November 30, 2013. Pooled weighted mean differences (WMDs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to estimate the strength of the association. A meta-analysis technique was used to study 38 trials involving 1,944 PCOS women and 1,654 healthy controls. Overall pooled adiponectin levels in women with PCOS were significantly reduced compared with healthy controls (WMD −2.67, 95 % CI −3.22 to −2.13; P = 0.000), yet with significant heterogeneity across studies (I2 = 95.9 %, P = 0.000). In subgroup analysis by HOMA-IR ratio and total testosterone ratio, inconsistent results were presented. No single study was found to affect the overall results by sensitivity testing. Meta-regression suggested that BMI might contribute little to the heterogeneity between including studies. Cumulative meta-analysis demonstrated the reliability and stability of the meta-analysis results. No evidence of publication bias was observed. Our meta-analysis suggested that circulating adiponectin levels in women with PCOS were significantly lower than those in healthy controls, which indicated that circulating adiponectin might play a role in the development of PCOS.

Keywords

Adiponectin Polycystic ovary syndrome Insulin resistance Obesity Meta-analysis 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was not supported by any kind of fund.

Conflict of interest

The authors declared that they have no conflict of interest in relation to this study.

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Copyright information

© International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers (ISOBM) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shan Li
    • 1
  • Xiamei Huang
    • 1
  • Huizhi Zhong
    • 1
    • 3
  • Qiliu Peng
    • 1
  • Siyuan Chen
    • 4
  • Yantong Xie
    • 5
  • Xue Qin
    • 1
  • Aiping Qin
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Clinical LaboratoryFirst Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical UniversityNanningChina
  2. 2.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive centerFirst Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical UniversityNanningChina
  3. 3.Department of AndrologyResearch Center for Population and Family Planning of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous RegionNanningChina
  4. 4.Guangxi University of Chinese MedicineNanningChina
  5. 5.Guangxi Medical UniversityNanningChina

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