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Tumor Biology

, Volume 34, Issue 6, pp 3675–3680 | Cite as

Quantitative assessment of the association between CYP1A1 A4889G polymorphism and endometrial cancer risk

  • Min Li
  • Yuan-Yue Li
  • Xiao-Yan Xin
  • Ying Han
  • Ting-Ting Wu
  • Hong-Bo Wang
Research Article

Abstract

Cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) A4889G polymorphism was supposed to be associated with endometrial cancer risk, but previous studies reported conflicting results. We therefore performed a meta-analysis of all relevant studies to get a comprehensive assessment of the association between CYP1A1 A4889G polymorphism and endometrial cancer risk. The pooled odds ratios (OR) with the corresponding 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) was calculated to assess the association. Finally, ten studies with a total of 1,682 endometrial cancer cases and 2,510 controls were finally included into the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis of the total ten studies showed that CYP1A1 A4889G polymorphism was not associated with endometrial cancer risk (ORG versus A = 1.14, 95 % CI 0.83–1.57, P OR = 0.417; ORGG versus AA = 1.23, 95 % CI 0.70–2.18, P OR = 0.470; ORGG versus AA/AG = 1.03, 95 % CI 0.59–1.81, P OR = 0.919; ORGG/AG versus AA = 1.22, 95 % CI 0.82–1.81, P OR = 0.336). Subgroup analyses by ethnicity further showed that there was also no obvious association between CYP1A1 A4889G polymorphism and endometrial cancer risk in both Caucasians and Asians. Sensitivity analysis by excluding single study in turns showed that the pooled estimations were not stable. Therefore, evidence for currently available data suggests that CYP1A1 A4889G polymorphism is not associated with endometrial cancer risk. However, more studies with large number of participants are needed to further assess the association precisely.

Keywords

CYP1A1 Endometrial cancer Polymorphism 

Notes

Conflicts of interest

None

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Copyright information

© International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers (ISOBM) 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Min Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yuan-Yue Li
    • 1
  • Xiao-Yan Xin
    • 1
  • Ying Han
    • 2
  • Ting-Ting Wu
    • 1
  • Hong-Bo Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Gynaecology and ObstetricsUnion Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and TechnologyWuhanChina
  2. 2.South Branch of the Six People’s Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong UniversityShanghaiChina

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