Tumor Biology

, Volume 34, Issue 4, pp 2183–2188 | Cite as

A common gene variant in PLS3 predicts colon cancer recurrence in women

  • Joanna Szkandera
  • Thomas Winder
  • Michael Stotz
  • Melanie Weissmueller
  • Tanja Langsenlehner
  • Martin Pichler
  • Hellmut Samonigg
  • Wilfried Renner
  • Armin Gerger
  • Gudrun Absenger
Research Article

Abstract

Recent evidence suggests that PLS3 (T-Plastin), an important member of the actin filamentous network, significantly influences cell invasion and metastasis. Germline polymorphisms within the PLS3 gene may impact the gene’s function, resulting in inter-individual differences in tumor recurrence capacity. In the present study, we investigated the association of germline polymorphisms in PLS3 to predict time to recurrence (TTR) in patients with stage II and III colon cancer. A total of 264 patients with histologically confirmed colon cancer were included in this retrospective study. Germline DNA was genotyped for rs871773 C>T, rs757124 C>G, rs1557770 G>T, rs6643869 G>A, and rs2522188 C>T in the PLS3 gene by 5′-exonuclease (TaqMan™) technology. As the PLS3 gene is located on the X chromosome, a gender-specific statistical analysis was performed. In univariate analysis, the minor allele of PLS3 rs871773 C>T was significantly associated with decreased TTR in women (hazard ratio (HR) = 5.02; 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.251–20.114; p = 0.023) and remained significantly associated in multivariate analysis (HR = 6.165; 95 % CI = 1.538–24.716; p = 0.010). Female patients carrying the C/T genotype in PLS3 rs871773 showed a median TTR of 69 months. In contrast, female patients with homozygous C/C had a median TTR of 112 months. There were no significant associations between PLS3 rs871773 C>T and TTR in male and between the other polymorphisms and TTR in male or female colon cancer patients. In conclusion, we identified a common gene variant in PLS3 as an independent prognostic marker in female patients with stage II and III colon cancer. Larger prospective trials are warranted to confirm these findings.

Keywords

Actin filamentous network Molecular markers Germline polymorphisms 

Notes

Conflicts of interest

None

Supplementary material

13277_2013_754_MOESM1_ESM.docx (17 kb)
ESM 1 (DOCX 17 kb)

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Copyright information

© International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers (ISOBM) 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joanna Szkandera
    • 1
  • Thomas Winder
    • 2
  • Michael Stotz
    • 1
  • Melanie Weissmueller
    • 1
  • Tanja Langsenlehner
    • 3
  • Martin Pichler
    • 1
  • Hellmut Samonigg
    • 1
  • Wilfried Renner
    • 4
    • 5
  • Armin Gerger
    • 1
    • 5
  • Gudrun Absenger
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Clinical Oncology, Department of MedicineMedical University of GrazGrazAustria
  2. 2.Department of MedicineAcademic Teaching Hospital FeldkirchFeldkirchAustria
  3. 3.Department of Therapeutic Radiology and OncologyMedical University of GrazGrazAustria
  4. 4.Clinical Institute of Medical and Laboratory DiagnosticsMedical University of GrazGrazAustria
  5. 5.Research Unit, Genetic Epidemiology and Pharmacogenetics, Division of Clinical Oncology, Department of MedicineMedical University of GrazGrazAustria

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