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Tumor Biology

, Volume 34, Issue 3, pp 1833–1838 | Cite as

The association between the poly(A) polymorphism in the VDR gene and cancer risk: a meta-analysis

  • Jin Huang
  • Jiqiao Yang
  • Haichuan Wang
  • Tianyuan Xiong
  • Hongbo Zhang
  • Yaxian Ma
  • Xiaoze Wang
  • Jichong Huang
  • Liang Du
Research Article

Abstract

The poly(A) polymorphism (L/S) in the VDR gene has been implicated in susceptibility of cancer, but a number of studies have reported inconclusive results. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the poly(A) polymorphism in the VDR gene and cancer risk by meta-analysis. We searched PubMed database, EMBASE database, CNKI database, and Wanfang database, covering all studies until January 22, 2013. Statistical analysis was performed by using the software Revman4.2 and STATA 10.0. A total 8,186 cancer cases and 8,685 controls in 19 case–control studies from 15 studies were identified for data analysis. The results suggested that the S allele carriers (SS + SL) did not have an increased or decreased risk of cancer when compared with the homozygote LL carriers (odds ratio (OR) = 0.96, 95 % CI = 0.87–1.06, P = 0.43 for SS + SL vs. LL). In addition, in the subgroup analysis by ethnicity and cancer type, no significant association was found among Caucasians, African-Americans, prostate cancer, or breast cancer. This current meta-analysis suggested that the poly(A) polymorphism in the VDR gene may not contribute to the risk of cancer. Future studies are needed to validate our findings.

Keywords

Vitamin D receptor Poly(A) Polymorphism Cancer Meta-analysis 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by grants 81101939 from National Natural Science Foundation of China.

Conflicts of interest

None

Supplementary material

13277_2013_724_MOESM1_ESM.doc (76 kb)
ESM 1 DOC 76 kb

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Copyright information

© International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers (ISOBM) 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jin Huang
    • 1
  • Jiqiao Yang
    • 1
  • Haichuan Wang
    • 1
  • Tianyuan Xiong
    • 1
  • Hongbo Zhang
    • 2
  • Yaxian Ma
    • 1
  • Xiaoze Wang
    • 1
  • Jichong Huang
    • 1
  • Liang Du
    • 3
  1. 1.West China Medical School/West China HospitalSichuan UniversityChengduChina
  2. 2.The Second Medical SchoolChengdu University of Traditional Chinese MedicineChengduChina
  3. 3.The Periodical Press of West China HospitalSichuan UniversityChengduChina

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